The Cars.com American-Made Index

What Are the Top American-Made Cars?
Cars.com's American-Made Index rates vehicles built and bought in the U.S. Factors include sales, where the car's parts are made and whether the car is assembled in the U.S. Models that have been discontinued are disqualified, as are those with a domestic-parts content rating below 75 percent.
RankMake/ModelU.S. Assembly LocationLast Rank
1.Ford F-150*Claycomo, Mo.;
Dearborn, Mich.;
1
2.Toyota Camry**,
Camry Solara
Georgetown, Ky.;
Lafayette, Ind.
2
3.Chevrolet Silverado 1500*Fort Wayne, Ind.;
Pontiac, Mich.
3
4.Chevrolet CobaltLordstown, Ohio4
5.Ford FocusWayne, Mich.
6.Toyota SiennaPrinceton, Ind.8
7. Chevrolet Malibu,
Malibu Maxx
Kansas City, Kan.6
8.Pontiac G6Orion, Mich.9
9.Ford Escape**Claycomo, Mo.10
10.Toyota TundraPrinceton, Ind.;
San Antonio, Texas

*Rankings based on estimated sales breakouts and/or production data.
**Excludes hybrid.

Sources: Automaker data, Automotive News, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

In today's global economy, there's no easy way to determine just how American a car is. Many cars built in the U.S., for example, are assembled using parts that come from somewhere else. Some cars assembled in the U.S. from strictly American-made parts don't sell very well, meaning that fewer Americans are building those models.

Cars.com's American-Made Index highlights the cars that are built here, have the highest amount of domestic parts, and are bought in the largest numbers by Americans.

There are a few options for determining a car's domestic-parts content. We went with the figure that appears alongside the window sticker of new cars as a result of the American Automobile Labeling Act, enacted in 1994. The AALA mandates that virtually every new car display the percentage, by cost, of its parts that originated in the U.S. and Canada. We deemed cars with a domestic-parts content rating of 75 percent or higher eligible for the index.

For cars that passed that test, we determined which were built in the U.S., and then considered how well they sold to arrive at our rankings. One last consideration was that the cars on the index need to be sticking around for the foreseeable future. If discontinuation is imminent, that means no autoworkers will be employed building it down the road, and it's disqualified.

As consumers compare domestic and foreign automakers, many are making their choice based on how good or bad a car's gas mileage is. See how domestic and foreign automakers match up in federal fuel efficiency ratings.

Check out December 2006's American-Made Index.

Posted on 6/26/07