Vehicle Name Sorted Alphabetically Kelley Blue Book Sorted by Pricing
2005 Chrysler Town & Country

Joe Wiesenfelder says: "Most compelling new feature: A latecomer to the disappearing-third-row-seat party, the Chrysler Group recently joined the pack — and then shot past its competition with second-row seats that do the same. The necessity for this feature in normal use is questionable, and the seats that perform this magic aren't as comfortable as the standard ones. Even the interior volume shrinks a bit compared to models without Stow 'n Go. Still, it beats the heck out of removing second-row seats to achieve the same ends, and the impressive engineering has breathed new life into models that haven't undergone a redesign as recently as have the leaders in this class. The Chrysler and Dodge both lag the frontrunners in IIHS crash-test ratings, dependability and refinement, but we can't argue with the buying public. In its own way, Stow 'n Go itself is a winner."
$3,450 – $7,950

2005 Dodge Grand Caravan

Joe Wiesenfelder says: "Most compelling new feature: A latecomer to the disappearing-third-row-seat party, the Chrysler Group recently joined the pack — and then shot past its competition with second-row seats that do the same. The necessity for this feature in normal use is questionable, and the seats that perform this magic aren't as comfortable as the standard ones. Even the interior volume shrinks a bit compared to models without Stow 'n Go. Still, it beats the heck out of removing second-row seats to achieve the same ends, and the impressive engineering has breathed new life into models that haven't undergone a redesign as recently as have the leaders in this class. The Chrysler and Dodge both lag the frontrunners in IIHS crash-test ratings, dependability and refinement, but we can't argue with the buying public. In its own way, Stow 'n Go itself is a winner."
$4,175 – $6,725

2005 Honda Odyssey

Joe Wiesenfelder says: "Conditional overall best bet: This citation is conditional simply because the Odyssey, redesigned for 2005, has not yet been crash tested by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. Otherwise it goes toe-to-toe with the Toyota Sienna in all the most important ways. Its interior volume is slightly lower and it doesn't offer all-wheel drive, but it includes significant features, like cruise control, that are options on the Sienna. Its ride quality improves over the previous generation's, yet its handling is remarkable. The fuel economy is startlingly good. Again, safety items like a standard electronic stability system, optional rearview camera and power doors that reverse at the slightest obstruction put the Odyssey above the fray. For long-term value, it's an excellent choice."
$8,375 – $12,950

2005 Kia Sedona

Joe Wiesenfelder says: "Best initial value: If you consider bang for the buck as important now as it will be throughout the vehicle's life, it's hard to beat the Sedona. Even though it will soon be replaced by a redesigned 2006 model, the current minivan gives you enough features at a low enough price that it deserves your consideration. As for the rest of the minivan's days, the industry's best warranty should take the edge off any concerns. One of the Sedona's drawbacks is its weight, which you feel when you take a quick turn — and when you stop at the gas pump. It has the worst fuel economy of 2005 minivans, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. If you're comfortable dealing with that as it comes, the Sedona is a good off-the-lot value package."
$4,050 – $5,400

2005 Mazda MPV

Joe Wiesenfelder says: "Best small minivan: OK, this is a bit of a fudge because the MPV is now the only small minivan. Mazda deserves some praise for continuing to serve this smaller percentage of minivan buyers. Besides, it's quite a good vehicle in its own right, with popular features like a flat-folding third-row seat and side windows that roll down, standard. Its drawbacks include erratic reliability, with older models rated above average, slowly falling to a below-average rating in the past two model years."
$7,025 – $9,350

2005 Toyota Sienna

Joe Wiesenfelder says: "Overall best bet: Returning this year as an overall Best Bet, the Sienna is at least average in all areas and exceptional in many others. It offers a comfortable, quiet ride, good power, and the safety performance, reliability and resale value for which Toyotas are known. In addition to all the frills, such safety-related features as an available electronic stability system and a rearview camera are still rare in this category. The Sienna absolutely will cost you more than a domestic minivan, but when you consider long-term value, it's possible the bargain is here."
$8,275 – $15,750