2018 Genesis G80 Sport Now Sports 5-Star Federal Crash Rating

2018 Genesis G80 Sport

The 2018 Genesis G80 Sport luxury sedan has earned a five-star safety rating, the highest possible score from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. This overall safety rating is conducted using a series of crash tests, including a car's performance in front and side impacts, along with its resistance to rolling over during an accident.

Related: 2018 Genesis G80 3.3T Sport: Does It Address Non-Sport's Shortcomings?

Getting top honors in overall safety is good news for the Genesis brand, which is competing against strong rivals in the mid-size luxury sedan market. With a starting price of approximately $56,245 (including a $995 destination charge), the G80 Sport 3.3T competes against cars like the Audi A6, BMW 5 Series, Lexus GS 350 F Sport and Mercedes-Benz E-Class. Among these rivals, the A6 and E-Class also received five stars for their overall rating on all or most versions, while the 5 Series and GS 350 have not been rated for the 2018 model year.

The G80 Sport trim level is new for the 2018 model year. Situated in the middle of the range, the G80 Sport comes powered by a 365-horsepower, 3.3-liter twin-turbo V-6 coupled to an eight-speed automatic transmission. Like the rest of the G80 range, buyers have a choice of rear- or all-wheel drive.

Standard safety equipment on the G80 Sport includes a rear-view camera, lane keep assist, lane departure warning, rear cross-traffic alert, blind spot monitors, driver attention alert, automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, adaptive cruise control and high-beam assist.

Prior to the Sport model earning five stars in NHTSA crash tests, the regular version of the 2017 and 2018 G80 received a Top Safety Pick Plus rating from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. While similar to the crash test regimen used by NHTSA, IIHS also takes into consideration a car's performance in crash tests where only a portion of the car's front end strikes an object.

These front overlap crash tests mimic the result of a car hitting an object like a lamp post, or only a corner of another vehicle. By putting a severe amount of stress on a smaller percentage of the front, these tests are notoriously more difficult and can show serious flaws in a car that might otherwise have performed admirably in a more traditional front crash test.

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