2018 Honda Pilot: What's the Cost of a Fill-Up?

2018 Honda Pilot

CARS.COM — After an unusually long wait, the 2018 Honda Pilot finally went on sale Tuesday. As we've noted, not much has changed from the 2017 model that finished third in our recent 2017 Three-Row SUV Challenge. That includes gas mileage — and how much you'll pay to fill up the tank.

Related: Highlander Vs. Pilot Video: Which 2017 3-Row SUV Should You Buy?

Granted, that would be less if you were filling up your Pilot this week. Motorists in most states paid less to fill their tanks as the national average for regular gas fell to the lowest level since the end of October. The average price of regular was $2.48 Thursday, according to the AAA Daily Fuel Gauge Report, down 2 cents from a week ago and 6 cents from a month ago.

  • If you're behind the wheel of a front-wheel-drive 2018 Pilot, that means you're paying $48.36 to fill a tank from top to bottom.
  • You'd pay $43.29 in the two states with the lowest average this week, Alabama and South Carolina, which averaged $2.22 statewide.
  • At the other end, filling up a Pilot will cost you $63.96 in Hawaii, the state with by far the highest average for regular at $2.28. In the contiguous U.S., you'll fork out the most dough for a fill-up in California, where the statewide average was $3.15 and a full tank in the Pilot would cost $61.43.

Pump prices fell 2 to 4 cents in several states but were offset by increases in the Great Lakes area, where price gyrations are common. Premium gas also dropped to a national average of $3.02, though diesel fuel was unchanged for the second week in a row at $2.84.

Though gas has fallen recently, analysts say it isn't a cinch that it will continue to decline. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and other major oil producers agreed last week to extend production cuts through 2018, a move that could push oil prices — and pump prices — higher in the coming months. So far, though, oil prices have dropped since OPEC's decision.

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