2018 Subaru Outback: What Does It Cost to Fill Up?

2018 Subaru Outback

CARS.COM — The venerable Subaru Outback receives minor updates for 2018. What that means for shoppers is that the Outback's unique limbo between wagon and SUV retains its utility and modesty inside and out. But what does that mean at the gas pump once you've purchased it and you're ready to hit the road?

Related: 2018 Subaru Impreza, Legacy, Outback, WRX Earn Top Safety Pick Plus Award

Even with an unchanged fuel tank capacity, it means more now that gas prices have fallen for the fourth week in a row thanks to a growing supply amid falling demand. The national average for regular dropped 3 cents to $2.45 on Thursday, according to the AAA Daily Fuel Gauge Report.

  • For a 2018 Outback, that translates to paying $45.33 to fill up a tank from empty at the national average.
  • Three states were tied for the lowest average price for regular, $2.20, on Thursday, according to AAA: Alabama, Missouri and South Carolina. You'll pay $40.70 to fill up an Outback in those states at that average.
  • As usual, Hawaii had the highest average price, $3.29, followed by Alaska at $3.20 and California at $3.12. To gas up an Outback in those states, you'll need to hand over $60.87, $59.20 and $57.72, respectively.

AAA said regular fell by a couple of pennies or more in all but a handful of states the past week. Premium gas dropped 2 cents to $3 even, while diesel fuel held steady at $2.84. Regular has fallen 11 cents over the past month, premium has fallen 9 cents and diesel has risen a penny.

Pump prices climbed in the first half of November when the supply of gasoline was crimped by refinery maintenance and damage to oil pipelines. In recent weeks, though, the Energy Information Agency has reported that gasoline inventories have been building as demand by consumers falls in a typical seasonal pattern.

A recent oil price rally also has fizzled. U.S. oil was trading at about $56.30 per barrel early Thursday, unchanged from a week ago.

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