2019 Hyundai Tucson Upgrades Light Way to Best Safety Rating

2019 Hyundai Tucson

Running changes to the available LED headlight systems have upgraded the refreshed 2019 Hyundai Tucson compact SUV to the highest Top Safety Pick Plus award in testing by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety. The new rating applies to Tucsons built after March of this year.

Related: 2019 Hyundai Tucson Review: Updates Freshen Journeyman Compact SUV’s Appeal

Modifications to the LED headlights on vehicles built after March raised their rating in the IIHS evaluation to the good score required for the top award. Those headlights are standard on the higher Sport, Limited and Ultimate trim levels (with high-beam assist on the Ultimate). However, the standard halogen headlights on the lower SE, Value and SEL trim levels remain rated by IIHS as poor.

The 2019 Tucson already was a Top Safety Pick based on its top marks in all crashworthiness tests by IIHS, which have toughened for 2019 with the added requirement for Top Safety Pick of an acceptable or good score (out of good, acceptable, marginal or poor) in IIHS’ new passenger-side small overlap frontal crash test.

The Tucson also got the required top superior score for the advanced front collision system with automatic emergency braking that is optional on the Ultimate trim. A camera-based front collision system is newly standard on all other Tucsons for 2019, but it has not yet been tested by IIHS.

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Versus Competitors

See how the 2019 Tucson stacks up against other small SUVs in IIHS testing here. Among its close rivals, the Tucson’s new rating now equals the 2019 Subaru Forester (with its standard headlights) and 2019 Mazda CX-5. And it now beats 2019 Honda CR-V, which failed to qualify as a Top Safety Pick Plus because of headlight performance, and the 2019 Toyota RAV and Chevrolet Equinox, both of which were kept from even Top Safety Pick status by their headlights. The 2019 Ford Escape failed to qualify also for lower scores in a crash test and for its front collision system.

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