2019 Nissan Sentra: Higher Price, Bigger Dash Screen, More Features

2019 Nissan Sentra; Manufacturer images

The Sentra compact sedan, one of Nissan's stragglers on getting Apple CarPlay or Android Auto, receives both smartphone integrations plus a larger dashboard screen for the 2019 model year. Both systems will come on all but the Sentra's base trim level, called the S, for 2019. That base trim starts at $18,685 and comes with a six-speed manual transmission, up $800 versus the outgoing 2018 Nissan Sentra S with a manual. (All prices reported here include an $895 destination charge.) Chalk up some of the increase up to the Sentra's larger dashboard screen, which now measures 7 inches — up substantially versus the 2018 Nissan Sentra's 5.0- or 5.8-inch screens, depending on trim.

Related: 2018 Nissan Sentra Prices Up Zero to a Lot

With the optional continuously variable automatic transmission, the 2019 Sentra S starts at $19,375. The next-higher Sentra SV runs $19,985, virtually unchanged from the 2018 Sentra SV. The SV trim is available with the automatic only, it gives you a pile of other features: both smartphone systems, an upgraded stereo, more USB ports, alloy wheels, dual-zone automatic climate control and keyless access with push-button start. For the extra $610, the joke's on anyone who doesn't make the jump to the SV spec.

Higher up are the Sentra SR ($21,485) and SL ($23,915). The SR Turbo Sentra ($23,465) adds a turbo four-cylinder we deemed a couple years ago as relatively cheap but light on fun, while the also-turbocharged Nissan Sentra NISMO is still around for $26,735 with a manual or the CVT. All other Nissan Sentra trim levels are CVT only.

Climb the trims of these Nissan's, and you can get specs like heated leather seats, a moonroof, a power driver's seat, adaptive cruise control and a blind spot warning system — all expected fare among higher echelons of today's compact sedans. As was the case last year, all CVT-equipped Sentras except the NISMO Sentra get forward collision warning with automatic emergency braking, a must-have safety feature that's fast proliferating among affordable cars.

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