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2020 Atlanta Auto Show: 2021 Genesis GV80 and 4 Other Things You Can’t Miss

I realize that most of the time Atlantans spend on the road is in rush-hour traffic, but that’s no reason you can’t enjoy the car you’re stuck in. Now’s the chance for Hotlanta to get up close to some of the hottest cars of the new model year and beyond. The 2021 Genesis GV80, 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E, 2020 Chevrolet Corvette and more will all be making their way to the ATL — so put down that Coca-Cola and start scrolling to learn all about what’s in store for y’all at the Atlanta International Auto Show.

Related: How to Car Shop at an Auto Show

 The Georgia World Congress Center, Building C, 285 Andrew Young International Blvd. NW in downtown Atlanta, will pack its show floor with cars, trucks and SUVs from 25 international and domestic brands. Starting up Wednesday, show hours are noon to 9 p.m. Feb. 26 and 27; noon to 10 p.m. Feb. 28; 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Feb. 29; and 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. March 1.

General admission is $12 for attendees age 12 or older, $6 for children 6-12 and free for children younger than 6 with a ticketed adult. Visit the show’s website for more info and to purchase advance tickets. Military and senior discounts are also available, but these tickets must be purchased onsite. Advanced discount parking is available through the convention center website.

An auto show is the best chance to car shop without a salesperson peeking over your shoulder, but there will also be a variety of attractions to keep even the least car-inclined member of your family entertained. Here are the top five things you can’t miss at the 2020 Atlanta International Auto Show:

1. 2021 Genesis GV80

2021 Genesis GV80

The all-new Genesis GV80 luxury SUV made its major automotive-exhibit entree at the 2020 Chicago Auto Show and will also be on display in Atlanta. The GV80 is the first SUV from Hyundai’s luxury brand, and it’s a stately looking entry into the SUV market. It takes styling cues from the redesigned 2020 Genesis G90 — dominated by a big, ostentatious grille, the diamond pattern of which carries over to the stitching on the seats. On the inside, the dash features a 14.5-inch split-screen infotainment display that is controlled by a touchscreen on the center console, while noise cancellation tech keeps the cabin quiet. Powering the SUV is one of two available engines: a 2.5-liter four-cylinder or a 3.5-liter V-6. Horsepower numbers are yet unknown, but it’s expected this new V-6 will outdo the Genesis’ existing 365-horsepower, 3.3-liter V-6.

The 2021 Genesis GV80 is expected to roll onto dealership lots in the summer. Pricing information has not yet been released.

Read more about the 2021 Genesis GV80 here.

2. 2021 Mustang Mach-E

2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E

When you come upon the all-new Mustang Mach-E on the show floor, you might not recognize it immediately as a Mustang — because it’s not, exactly. Of course, you’ll see the classic branding on the grille, but an all-electric SUV is not a form the iconic muscle-car moniker has graced before. Built on a dedicated EV platform, the Mach-E is looking to be a direct competitor to the upcoming Tesla Model Y. So, of course, tech is huge in this thing. The 15.5-inch vertically oriented touchscreen is powered by Ford’s new Sync 4 multimedia system, and it takes over an otherwise minimalist interior. It also comes equipped for hands-free highway driving, though Ford hasn’t said when that feature will be activated. Still, the Mach-E minds its Mustang inspiration; Ford says the GT Performance edition will do 0-60 in the mid-3-second range.

First Edition Mach-Es were already made available for preorder starting at $61,000 (including a $1,000 destination charge). These Mach-Es will ship in late 2020, but only if you’ve already put down the $500 deposit — they sold out late last year. An entry-level Select trim Mach-E starts at $44,995 and will be available in early 2021. All trims are eligible for the $7,500 federal EV tax credit.

Read more about the 2021 Mustang Mach-E here.

3. 2020 Chevrolet Corvette

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Z51

A favorite of this auto-show season is the new, exotic-looking 2020 Chevrolet C8 Corvette — and that may be because this beloved supercar is totally new. In fact, Chevy says only one part was carried over from the previous model. The eighth-gen (hence, C8) Corvette features an all-new mid-engine design. Situated behind the occupant seats is a 6.2-liter V-8 that pumps out 490 hp and does 0-60 mph in 3 seconds flat (or 2.9 seconds if you opt for the Z51 Performance Package) — which, for those keeping score at home, makes this the fastest Vette ever.

The 2020 Chevy Corvette is fast in almost every way — except in its arrival on dealership lots. You can order one online now, starting at $59,995, including a $1,095 destination charge.

Read more about the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette here.

4. Test Drives and Ride-Alongs

2020 Nissan Leaf

Getting behind the wheel is perhaps the best way to determine whether a car is the right one for you. Nine brands are slated to have vehicles available to take for a test spin. The specific models have not yet been released for most, but here’s the list of car brands with vehicles available for test drives and ride-alongs:

  • Chevrolet
  • Chrysler
  • Dodge
  • Fiat
  • Jeep
  • Nissan: Leaf
  • Ram
  • Volkswagen
  • Polaris: Slingshot open-air, three-wheeled roadster

Test drives vary by day and automaker, so be sure to check the schedule here.

5. ‘Christmas Vacation’ Cousin Eddie RV

The holiday season may be long over (though no judgment if you have yet to take down the Christmas decorations), but a Christmas classic will be making an appearance at the Atlanta auto show: Cousin Eddie’s RV from “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation.” In all its rusty glory, the 1972 Condor II RV — yes, the actual one used in the film — will be on display for show-goers. (But we’d steer clear of any nearby storm sewers if we were you.)

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