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2020 Subaru Legacy Gets a Dose of Luxury

2020 Subaru Legacy; Cars.com photos by Christian Lantry

The all-wheel-drive Subaru Legacy sedan has a reputation for being a solid, practical choice in the mid-size sedan class. With the 2020 redesign, the automaker is doubling down on that formula, but it's adding a dash of refinement and heaps of technology - to most versions.

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Outside, the new Legacy's changes are subtle and evolutionary. It's hard to make a mid-size sedan's styling sizzle, but Subaru gets points for adding some visual drama with a more sloping hood and muscular fenders. The changes combine for an overall more dynamic look.

2020 Subaru Legacy

Inside the new Touring XT shown at the auto show, the ginormous vertical screen steals the show. The 11.6-inch touchscreen (not available on the base model) reminds me of the Volvo XC90's setup, and I'm a fan. It looks slick and modern, and will hopefully be as easy to use as the automaker's other touchscreen system. I also applaud its incorporation of knobs for important knob-needing functions like volume and tuning.

Overall cabin comfort is impressive, too. The Touring XT model's new leather interior, combined with added convenience goodies like a heated steering wheel and ventilated seats, are big perks that make it feel like a much more premium car than the old Legacy, which was still comfortable but also had a utilitarian feel.

2020 Subaru Legacy

Room is another win. Rear legroom in the old model was generous, and the new one offers even more. Subaru says this is its largest Legacy and that the 2020 model has a roomier interior than mid-size sedan competitors.

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Subaru made a lot of claims when it unveiled the new Legacy - that it's the safest, quietest, most comfortable Legacy ever. That's a lot of superlatives to live up to, but what I've seen so far is promising.

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