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2021 Genesis GV80 Video: Not Just Some Spiffed-Up Hyundai Palisade

2021 Genesis GV80

Back in November of 2015, South Korean automaker Hyundai announced the formation of a new luxury brand called Genesis. At the time, Hyundai said Genesis would have six new models by 2020. Well, it’s 2020, and we’ve only seen three models, all sedans. In case you haven’t been paying attention lately, people haven’t really been buying sedans — they’ve been buying SUV›s. At the 2020 Chicago Auto Show, 51 months after the announcement of Genesis, the brand’s first SUV showed itself to the general public: the GV80. It’s about time.

Related: More Chicago Auto Show Coverage

The GV80 isn’t based on the same platform as Hyundai’s Palisade, the three-row SUV Genesis’ parent company just introduced (and just named Cars.com’s Best of 2020). It’s based on an all-new platform that isn’t shared with any current Genesis or Hyundai vehicle, though it will underpin the next generation of the G80 sedan, Genesis’ mid-tier sports sedan.

The GV80’s styling is definitely a new step for Genesis. Its closest similarities are to the G90, Genesis’ full-size flagship sedan that was just refreshed for the 2020 model year. The GV80’s most similar aspect is the large grille, which doesn’t stretch all the way down to the ground as it does on the G90, but does extend pretty far down the front bumper.

Inside the GV80, cabin materials are lush and there’s a high-tech look and feel to things. There’s a decent amount of practicality and usability from what we saw at the auto show, however. It’s nice to see physical controls persist even as Genesis says it eliminated many of them to reduce clutter.

Check out the full video below for the rest of my thoughts on Genesis’ first-ever SUV. The GV80 goes on sale in the summer, and we’ll have plenty more information on it closer to its on-sale date.

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