NEW
Take our quiz & meet the car you’ll love.

Dodge Charger: Which Should You Buy, 2019 or 2020?

Most significant changes: New Widebody versions of the Scat Pack and SRT Hellcat join the lineup; the Widebody is optional on the Scat Pack and the only way you can get an SRT Hellcat for 2020. Also new: a Daytona 50th Anniversary Edition model, based on the SRT Hellcat Widebody.

Price change: Base prices are higher by $25 on the SXT all-wheel drive; $150 on the GT and R/T; and $425 on the SXT rear-wheel-drive model. The SRT Hellcat jumps by $3,850 with the new Widebody. Base price on the Scat Pack is $250 lower, while the Scat Pack Widebody (previously unavailable) is $5,750 more than last year’s Scat Pack. All prices include a $1,495 destination charge that’s unchanged from 2019.

On sale: Early 2020

Which should you buy, 2019 or 2020? If you want the Widebody, 2020. Despite steep premiums for the Widebody and Daytona models, these are unique renditions that give the Charger more appeal to enthusiasts. Price increases on other models are modest.

Dodge builds on the muscle-car heritage of the Charger with new Widebody versions on the Scat Pack and SRT Hellcat. Based on the latter, a Daytona 50th Anniversary Edition commemorates winged production models introduced in 1969.

Widebody models wear integrated fender flares that add 3.5 inches of width and space for 11-inch wide wheels with Pirelli P305/35ZR20 tires (the 2019 model-year SRT Hellcat had P275/40ZR20s). The SRT Hellcat comes only in Widebody form for 2020, and the Scat Pack comes in Widebody and standard-width versions. The starting price on the Scat Pack Widebody is $47,490. That’s $6,000 more than the standard-width Scat Pack.

Related: 2020 Dodge Charger Scat Pack and Hellcat Widebody Review: Which to Buy?

The Hellcat’s supercharged 6.2-liter V-8 engine delivers 707 horsepower, and Dodge claims a top speed of 196 mph. The Hellcat, available only with rear-wheel drive, has new electric power steering that you can adjust for effort and feel, plus a new front bumper. Its base price jumps $3,850 versus last year’s narrow-body Hellcat to $71,140.

Dodge says it will build only 501 copies of the Daytona 50th Anniversary Edition, which is based on the Hellcat and adds 10 horsepower from different engine calibrations. Anniversary models will come with Daytona decals, a unique rear spoiler and a $75,635 price.

Dealers will start taking orders for the Daytona as well as other Charger models later this fall, and cars hit dealerships early in 2020.

Elsewhere in the Charger lineup, the Scat Pack models use a 6.4-liter V-8 with 485 horsepower, and the R/T has a 5.7-liter V-8 with 370 horsepower. The GT and base SXT models have a 300-horsepower, 3.6-liter V-6 engine. The SXT is available with rear- or all-wheel drive; other models are RWD only.

Dodge keeps wringing more performance out of the Charger and more sales out of an old-school formula — V-8 power and rear-wheel drive — wrapped in four-door sedan packaging. Though it isn’t among the top-selling passenger cars, the Charger outsells performance coupes like the Ford Mustang, Chevrolet Camaro and Dodge Challenger, and it far outsells the Toyota Avalon, a similarly large sedan. The Chrysler 300 is closely related to the Charger (Dodge is a brand of Fiat Chrysler Automobiles), though it lacks as many performance editions.

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

 
Related Articles