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Fast Five: The Top 5 Cars.com News Stories of the Week

We knew y'all loved pickup trucks, but we were pleasantly surprised at how one recent news article fueled your interest in diesel pickup models. Our Brian Normile's story putting the true cost of diesel into perspective for car shoppers was the top piece of Cars.com content published in the past week — by a margin you could drive a truck through.

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The story examines the direct and associated costs of equipping a new pickup truck with a diesel engine and cautions that in regular everyday driving scenarios (versus a long-haul work-truck situation, for example), it may be difficult to realize anticipated fuel savings from the ostensibly more efficient powertrain. Normile looks at the sometimes massive costs (up to nearly $10,000) of diesel engines on pickups including the mid-size 2019 Chevrolet Silverado, 2018 GMC Canyon; the half-ton (or thereabouts) 2018 Ford F-150, 2018 Nissan Titan XD and 2018 Ram 1500; and big boys like the 2019 Chevrolet Silverado heavy duty, 2019 Ford Super Duty, 2019 GMC Sierra heavy duty and 2018 Ram heavy duty.

The diesel trucks story easily beat out its next-nearest competitor for the top spot, our sneak peek of Audi's all-new, all-wheel-drive, long-range electric SUV, the e-tron, on the eve of its world unveiling in San Francisco on Monday.

Without further ado, here are the five articles Cars.com readers couldn't get enough of:

1. Sorry, Fuel Savings on Diesel Pickup Trucks May Not Make Up for the Cost

2. Everything We Know About the Audi e-tron Ahead of Tonight's Reveal

3. 2019 Jeep Cherokee: So, About Those Headlights...

4. 2019 Ford Edge Dulls Mileage Expectations, Sharpens AWD Abilities

5. 2019 Nissan Rogue Is a Safer Bet for the Same Money

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