Honda Goes Big on Odyssey Safety Features for 2021, Small on Price Increase

Honda’s people mover, the Odyssey minivan, gets more people-friendly for 2021 with a light exterior styling refresh, upgraded interior materials and some additional standard safety features. Its cost bump is minimal, too: The 2021 Odyssey starts at $32,910 — $1,000 more than the outgoing model (all prices include destination). 

Related: What’s New From Honda for 2021?

That price is for the base LX model. The van will again be available in EX, EX-L, Touring and Elite trims, and all versions see a modest price increase for the new model year except for the Touring model, which sees a small price drop. For the new model year, shoppers get some new minor features — such as LED headlights on the LX trim, additional USB ports on the  EX-L trim and perforated leather seat inserts and piping on Elite models — and some significant safety systems.

New this year is a standard rear-seat reminder system that warns drivers to check the backseats before exiting the van; warnings come via an audible chime and a warning message displayed on the instrument cluster. In uplevel Touring and Elite trims, it works with the CabinWatch camera system to display an image of the rear seats (and what you may have left in them). 

More big safety news: The Honda Sensing suite of advanced electronic safety features is now standard across the Odyssey lineup (it was previously only available on EX and higher models). It includes features such as automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, traffic sign recognition, lane departure warning with lane keep assist and adaptive cruise control. 

The 2021 Odyssey’s new price puts it below rival Chrysler Pacifica, which starts at $35,540 for 2020, but that’s for the very well-equipped Touring model. The base version of the Pacifica, called the Voyager, starts at $28,730. For 2021, Toyota announced the Sienna minivan will be offered only as a hybrid; no word yet on pricing, however. 

The new Odyssey goes on sale in early August. 

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