How Much Does It Cost to Fill Up a 2019 Hyundai Elantra?

2019 Hyundai Elantra

Despite consumers steering away from passenger cars in favor of SUVs and pickup trucks, manufacturers, aren't giving up on cars. That's the case with the refreshed 2019 Hyundai Elantra, which will go on sale in the fall with fresh exterior styling, additional standard safety features and new infotainment offerings. The engine choices are unchanged from 2018 and include 1.4- and 1.6-liter turbocharged four-cylinders and a naturally aspirated 2.0-liter.

Related: 2019 Hyundai Elantra Gets Style Update, Safety Upgrade

So what would it cost to fill up a 2019 Hyundai Elantra? Well, given the same powertrains ... exactly the same as it would cost you if you were driving the 2018 model. Here is what it would cost to fill the 2019 Elantra's 14-gallon tank based on average prices posted on Thursday by the AAA Daily Fuel Gauge Report:

  • At the national average of $2.83, filling the tank from empty would cost $39.62.
  • In South Carolina, which had the lowest average price for regular at $2.53, the cost would drop to $35.42.
  • In California, where regular was the highest in the contiguous U.S. at $3.59, filling the tank would be $50.26. In Hawaii, however, where regular averaged $3.78, the cost would be $52.92.

Gas prices inched down a couple of pennies for the second week in a row, and the AAA Daily Fuel Gauge Report Thursday said all but a handful of states saw pump prices fall by at least a penny or two. As prices have eased in recent weeks, the number of states where regular averaged $3 or more has dropped from 13 to 12.

The national average for premium gas fell 2 cents to $3.38, and for diesel fuel it fell a penny to $3.14. Regular gas on Thursday was 49 cents higher than a year ago, premium was 52 cents higher and diesel was 61 cents higher.

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