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Hyundai Tucson N Line Stays in Line With Sporty-Styled Siblings

Hyundai Tucson N Line

Hyundai’s performance-oriented N division has gotten its hands on the Tucson SUV, and the results are being teased ahead of a full debut at the 2019 Geneva International Motor Show. If you’re not familiar with the N division, think Lexus’ F Sport lineup or BMW’s M vehicles but, you know, Hyundai.

Related: Hyundai Kicks Off Sportier N Line Models With 2019 Elantra GT

The teaser images don’t show much. On the exterior, there’s a new front fascia with unique daytime running lights, as well as different wheels and N Line badging on the front fender. If the exterior treatment continues in the same path as it does with other models, expect a revised rear bumper, and perhaps a spoiler extending from the roof, too.

Hyundai Tucson N Line

Inside, we only get to see a new gear selector with N Line badging and red stitching that is also visible on the center armrest, as well as what appear to be pedals with a metal finish. In keeping with the rest of the N Line treatment inside, there will likely be a unique N Line steering wheel and sport seats.

Don’t expect performance upgrades like a new engine, transmission or suspension, although all three are likely to be retuned for greater performance — sportier engine programming, quicker shifts from the transmission, stiffer suspension for better handling — as part of the N Line treatment.

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Will the Tucson N Line make it to North America? Probably, at some point. We already have the Elantra GT N Line and Veloster N — a more hardcore trim level than the N Line. If or when the updated Tucson sells well for Hyundai here, why not add a slightly sportier-looking and sportier-performing model, too? (It probably has an exhaust note that sounds like a money-counting machine.)

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