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Updated 2021 Infiniti QX50 Makes Safety, Convenience Features More Accessible

Silver 2021 INFINITI QX50 2021 Infiniti QX50 | Manufacturer image

Infiniti redesigned its QX50 SUV for 2019, and for 2021 the automaker is adding more comfort and safety features, along with a small price increase. The 2021 QX50 starts $700 more than last year  at $38,975 (all prices include destination) for the entry-level Pure trim with front-wheel drive. 

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From least to most expensive, the QX50 is again available in Pure, Luxe, Essential, Sensory and Autograph trims with front- or all-wheel drive. More standard features have been added on all trim levels, including two safety features: rear-seat-mounted side-impact supplemental airbags and automatic collision notification with emergency call system. Acoustic laminated front side glass and Wi-Fi hot-spot capability are now also standard on all models. 

On Luxe trims, heated front seats join the convenience standards list as well as several safety systems: smart cruise control, distance control assist, blind spot assist, lane departure prevention and ProPilot Assist. Luxe models start at $42,525 for 2021, an increase of $1,250. Available on Luxe trims this year is a new Appearance Package that adds 20-inch black-painted wheels, black mirror caps, dark chrome accents, a mesh black grille and a graphite headliner.

Uplevel trims also add extra standards for 2021. Traffic sign recognition and the previously optional Climate Package now come on the Essential trim, which is $600 more than the model-year 2020 version at $45,725. 

A head-up display is now standard on Sensory models, which starts $1,100 more than last year at $51,025. The Autograph trim adds the direct adaptive steering system as standard for 2021 and is $350 more than last year at $55,225.

The 2021 Infiniti QX50 is on sale now.

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