• (4.9) 32 reviews
  • Available Prices: $4,812–$39,032
  • Body Style: Sedan
  • Combined MPG: 16
  • Engine: 556-hp, 6.2-liter V-8 (premium)
  • Drivetrain: Rear-wheel Drive
  • Transmission: 6-speed automatic w/OD
2013 Cadillac CTS

Our Take on the Latest Model 2013 Cadillac CTS

What We Don't Like

  • Optional suspension's ride quality
  • Limited steering feedback
  • Backrest contour of Recaro bucket seats
  • Sedan's backseat room

Notable Features

  • Choice of V-6 engines
  • Rear- or all-wheel drive
  • Coupe, sedan or wagon body styles
  • High-performance supercharged V-8 in V-Series

2013 Cadillac CTS Reviews

Cars.com Expert Reviews

Editor's note: This review was written in May 2012 about the 2012 Cadillac CTS. Little of substance has changed with this year's model. To see what's new for 2013, click here, or check out a side-by-side comparison of the two model years.

The 2012 Cadillac CTS sedan offers shoppers an attractive blend of design, luxury and performance.

Now in its fifth model year, the CTS is the luxury sedan that began Cadillac's design-led transformation when the car debuted as a 2003 model, and the second-generation car that launched for 2008 furthered the brand's push into the sport-sedan market.

The CTS sedan starts at $36,810 (all prices include an $895 destination charge), but our test car was a high-end Premium model with a starting price of $49,185. With options, the as-tested price was $52,345. To see how the car's specs compare with models from Infiniti, BMW and Mercedes-Benz, click here.

Styling
The first-generation CTS set Cadillac on its current styling direction with its creased, angular shape, but the design philosophy really hit its stride with this second-generation car. Sharp edges create a look that's uniquely Cadillac, but the design isn't forced like it was in some places on the first-gen car.

You also can get the CTS in coupe and wagon body styles, but the design looks best to my eye on the sedan. Its rear styling is the most cohesive with the front end, which doesn't differ much among body styles.

The 2012 CTS gets new grille styling, but the changes are subtle and the overall shield shape that's become a familiar Cadillac design cue remains.

Ride & Handling
Our test CTS had the optional performance suspension, and the car felt as firm as one of the high-performance V-Series versions that Cadillac sells, with harsh, jarring responses over bumps. It's not far removed from the suspension tuning on Mercedes' AMG models, like the C63 AMG, which is a firm-riding sport sedan.

The payback, however, is minimal body roll, which is welcome when the road bends. The performance suspension includes thicker front and rear stabilizer bars — as well as a limited-slip differential if you opt for summer tires — but the steering prevents the car from being as engaging as it might otherwise be; steering effort is light and steering feedback expectations remain unmet.

Tires play a significant part in the ride and handling equation, which is why it was unfortunate that our rear-wheel-drive CTS arrived with Bridgestone Blizzak winter tires on its 19-inch wheels. With temperatures in the 50s, spring was well under way when we drove the car. The summer tires that are normally part of the optional Performance Package would have been a better match for the conditions.

Engine & Transmission
The CTS comes standard with a 3.0-liter V-6 engine, but our test car's optional 3.6-liter V-6 and six-speed automatic transmission are a special pair among drivetrains. The transmission's shifts are unobtrusive, and it's always in the right gear for the driving situation. The automatic is also incredibly responsive; press down on the gas pedal and it downshifts immediately. A lot of automatics make you wait before kicking down, which makes it refreshing to drive one that's so attentive to the driver's wishes.

The 3.6-liter V-6 has power in reserve for accelerating around other cars on the highway, and the transmission responsiveness remains. The sedan moves out well, and the V-6's mechanical growl sounds good in the process. This V-6 makes more power for 2012 — 318 horsepower, an increase of 14 hp — and is also 20 pounds lighter than its predecessor. The engine received a number of changes, including new cylinder heads with integrated exhaust manifolds, a composite intake manifold and lighter, stronger connecting rods.

With the automatic transmission, the 3.6-liter V-6 is rated at an EPA-estimated 18/27 mpg city/highway. That's slightly better than the 2012 Infiniti M37's estimate of 18/26 mpg, but it trails the ratings for the 2012 BMW 535i (21/31 mpg) and the 2012 Mercedes-Benz E350 (20/30 mpg). However, unlike those three models, the CTS can run on regular gas as opposed to more expensive premium fuel. Only the supercharged CTS-V requires premium.

Interior Quality & Comfort
The CTS' cabin quality has held up well since this generation first hit the road as a 2008 model, and it's still competitive against newer entrants like the 535i and M37. Among the highlights are consistently applied premium materials including stitching on the dashboard and door trim, and smartly integrated features like an available navigation touch-screen that can rise from the dash or, when lowered, display a list of radio presets. The location of the air-conditioning controls at knee-level seemed a little curious, but it didn't take long to understand the logic of the setup; your hand falls right to the controls, so you barely need to move it to adjust the temperature.

While the cabin is high on premium materials and luxury features, what it doesn't have in abundance is space. The front of the cabin is comfortable but snug, and the optional Recaro-brand sport seats — similar to those available in the CTS-V — contribute to the sensation with adjustable side bolsters that keep you locked down in corners.

The Recaro bucket seats have adjustable lumbar support, but even with it backed off completely, you can still feel the curve of the backrest pushing against your lower back. It wasn't painful, but if you're sensitive to this kind of thing, it definitely warrants extra attention if you take the CTS for a test drive.

The CTS sedan's bigger problem is backseat space. Despite being significantly larger on the outside than the redesigned BMW 3 Series sedan, the CTS' backseat feels smaller. I'm 6 feet 1 inch tall and didn't have enough legroom or headroom. It's not nearly as comfortable as a midsize four-door needs to be.

Safety
The CTS sedan performed well in crash tests conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. It received the IIHS' 2012 Top Safety Pick designation, which is awarded to cars that receive Good scores in each of its four tests, as well NHTSA's five-star rating, the highest possible.

Standard safety features include antilock brakes and an electronic stability system, which are required on cars beginning with 2012 models. Also standard are side-impact airbags for the front seats, side curtain airbags for both rows and active front head restraints. GM's emergency communications system, OnStar, includes one year of complimentary service that has features like automatic crash notification, stolen car assistance and the ability to remotely unlock the doors.

A backup camera and rear parking sensors are optional. For a list of safety features, check out the Features & Specs page, or see how well child-safety seats fit in the CTS Car Seat Check.

CTS in the Market
It's hard to overstate what the CTS has meant to Cadillac from a design and performance perspective. It's been the cornerstone of the brand's reinvention over the past decade and has come to represent the modern Cadillac image.

The CTS checks most of the boxes it needs to in the luxury sport sedan segment with its distinctive design, upscale interior and refined 3.6-liter V-6 drivetrain. That said, discerning handling enthusiasts will get more enjoyment from the more expensive BMW 5 Series.

Send Mike an email  


Consumer Reviews

(4.9)

Average based on 32 reviews

Write a Review

Great looking & performing black-on-black CTS lux

by Peggeled from Hilton Head Island, SC on December 6, 2017

This car is sexy looking and drives great. It has had all of the recommended maintenance checks. It has never had an issue that I had to deal with. Car seat fits great in back seat with ample room fo... Read Full Review

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3 Trims Available

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Wondering which configuration is right for you?
Our 2013 Cadillac CTS trim comparison will help you decide.
 

Cadillac CTS Articles

2013 Cadillac CTS Safety Ratings

Crash-Test Reports

Recalls

There are currently 2 recalls for this car.


Safety defects and recalls are relatively common. Stay informed and know what to do ahead of time.

Safety defects and recalls explained

Service & Repair

Estimated Service & Repair cost: $3,000 per year.

Save on maintenance costs and do your own repairs.

Warranty Coverage

Bumper-to-Bumper

48mo/50,000mi

Powertrain

72mo/70,000mi

Roadside Assistance Coverage

72mo/70,000mi

Free Scheduled Maintenance

48mo/50,000mi

What you should get in your warranty can be confusing. Make sure you are informed.

Learn More About Warranties

Warranties Explained

Bumper-to-Bumper

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

Powertrain

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

Roadside Assistance

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

Free Scheduled Maintenance

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

Other Years