• (4.2) 31 reviews
  • MSRP: $3,790–$14,918
  • Body Style: Truck
  • Combined MPG: 19-23
  • Engine: 175-hp, 2.8-liter I-4 (regular gas)
  • Drivetrain: 4x2
  • Towing Capacity: 1,600 lbs.
2006 Chevrolet Colorado

Our Take on the Latest Model 2006 Chevrolet Colorado

What We Don't Like

  • Ride comfort
  • Engine noise
  • Rear-seat passenger space
  • Interior construction details

Notable Features

  • 175- or 220-hp engine
  • Three cab configurations
  • Three suspension choices
  • Available Z71 and ZQ8 packages
  • Xtreme edition available
  • Optional roof-rail side-curtain airbags

2006 Chevrolet Colorado Reviews

Vehicle Overview
Chevrolet launched the compact Colorado pickup truck in 2004. Offered with a four- or five-cylinder engine, the Colorado is closely related to the GMC Canyon.

Colorados come with two- or four-wheel drive and in regular-cab, extended-cab and Crew-Cab configurations. Both a Z71 offroad performance suspension and a ZQ8 low-riding sport suspension are available. Two trim levels are offered: LS and step-up LT. The Xtreme edition includes the ZQ8 suspension, a unique body-colored front fascia with fog lamps, rocker extension moldings and monochromatic paint in a choice of four colors.

For the 2006 model year, a Sun & Sound Package with a sunroof and in-dash six-CD changer is available for the LT edition. Upgraded cloth upholstery goes into the LT and onto seatbacks of Crew Cab models. A Street Pack option adds a color-keyed appearance to base, regular-length extended-cab models.


Exterior
The Colorado's styling has been called aerodynamic, angular and athletic. The Colorado has an independent front suspension and a solid rear axle.

Regular-cab trucks are 192.8 inches long overall on a 111.2-inch wheelbase, while extended- and Crew-Cab models measure about 207 inches long on a 125.9-inch span. Standard steel wheels measure 15 inches in diameter, but aluminum wheels are available. The ZQ8 package includes 17-inch tires, and 18-inch tires are mounted on models with the Xtreme option. Hydraulically assisted rack-and-pinion steering is installed.


Interior
Chevrolet says the Colorado's interior looks and feels more like a well-appointed full-size pickup than the down-market compact that it is. Extended-cab models have four doors and forward-facing rear seats. Crew-Cab models have a 60/40-split, folding rear seat that holds three adults. Regular-cab trucks feature a 60/40-split bench seat upholstered in cloth or leather, and bucket seats are available.

Options include remote keyless entry, heated leather seating, General Motors' OnStar communication system and XM Satellite Radio.


Under the Hood
The dual-overhead-cam Vortec 2.8-liter inline-four-cylinder yields 175 horsepower and 185 pounds-feet of torque, while the 3.5-liter inline-five generates 220 hp and 225 pounds-feet of torque. Both engines use electronic throttle control.

Either engine can drive a five-speed-manual gearbox or a four-speed-automatic transmission. Chevrolet's shift-on-the-fly four-wheel-drive system operates with a dashboard-mounted switch. A locking differential is optional, and rear-drive models can be equipped with traction control.


Safety
Antilock brakes with tandem power boosters, dual-piston front discs and rear drums are standard. Dual-stage front-impact airbags are standard, and roof-rail side curtain-type airbags are optional.

Driving Impressions
More refined than Chevrolet's old, moderately smaller S-10, the Colorado combines satisfying performance and appropriate handling skills with a pleasantly roomy cockpit. Performance with the five-cylinder engine is sufficiently energetic, and it's helped by exceptionally good automatic-transmission behavior. You can expect quite a bit of bouncing on rougher surfaces, but the suspension is otherwise well controlled.

Drawbacks include a somewhat stiff ride and a slightly noisy engine, but the Colorado provides an appealing compromise between full-size and compact trucks. Some interior details are a bit rough, but the Colorado is solid overall. The seats are barely bolstered and have modest back support, but headroom is abundant and elbow space is ample. Legroom is minimal in the back of the Crew-Cab version, and headroom is tight. The backseat headrests significantly impair rear visibility.


Consumer Reviews

4.2

Average based on 31 reviews

Write a Review

Go ahead and get a full size truck.

by John Larsen from Beaufort, SC on October 29, 2017

It’s awkwardly boxy and I had the most repairs ever with a Chevrolet. Almost as many as a ford ranger I used to own. Never again for either.

Read All Consumer Reviews

14 Trims Available

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Wondering which configuration is right for you?
Our 2006 Chevrolet Colorado trim comparison will help you decide.
 

Chevrolet Colorado Articles

2006 Chevrolet Colorado Safety Ratings

Crash-Test Reports

Recalls

There are currently 4 recalls for this car.


Safety defects and recalls are relatively common. Stay informed and know what to do ahead of time.

Safety defects and recalls explained

Service & Repair

Estimated Service & Repair cost: $4,400 per year.

Save on maintenance costs and do your own repairs.

Warranty Coverage

What you should get in your warranty can be confusing. Make sure you are informed.

Learn More About Warranties

Warranties Explained

Bumper-to-Bumper

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

Powertrain

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

Roadside Assistance

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

Free Scheduled Maintenance

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

Other Years