• Inventory Prices: $6,282–$16,466
  • Body Style: Cargo Van
  • Combined MPG: N/A
  • Drivetrain: Rear-wheel Drive
  • Seats: 1-5
  • Cargo Space: 237.8 cu.ft.
2009 Ford E250

Our Take on the Latest Model 2009 Ford E250

What We Don't Like

  • Fuel economy
  • Handling
  • Ride comfort in city
  • Difficult to park

Notable Features

  • New front-end styling
  • Three duty ratings
  • Redesigned instrument panel and console
  • Available V-8, V-10 and diesel engines
  • Standard electronic stability control on wagon and recreational vans
  • Standard electronic throttle control
  • Standard oil cooler

2009 Ford E250 Reviews

Vehicle Overview
The E-Series received new front-end styling similar to Ford's full-size SuperDuty trucks in 2008, with a large front grille and squared-off highlights. The E-Series is available as a passenger wagon that can carry up to 15 people and a commercial van version that offers up to 275 cubic feet of cargo space. Formerly called the Econoline, the rear-wheel-drive E-150 comes in only one size. Passenger versions are sold in XL, XLT and XLT Premium Wagon trim levels. The E-150 competes with the Chevrolet Express and Dodge Sprinter.

(Skip to details on the: E-250, E-350 and E-450 Super Duty)


New for 2009
For 2009, the E-Series gets a redesigned instrument panel that includes four new upfitter switches, optional factory-installed navigation, V-8 engines that are E-85 capable, and rear doors that swing out 172 degrees.

Exterior
Offered in one length, both the E-150 van and wagon have a 138-inch wheelbase and are 216.7 inches long overall — much shorter than the Dodge Sprinter. Swing-out 60/40-split doors are installed on the right side, but a sliding cargo door is available as a no-cost option. Swing-out doors are the only choice in the rear.

  • New rear-door system allows 95-degree opening, but with a light push the opening can increase to 172 degrees
  • Available chrome bumpers and aerodynamic headlights


Interior
Aimed at commercial applications, the cargo-hauling van is fitted with two bucket seats up front. Passenger models have seating for eight occupants on two front buckets and a pair of three-passenger bench seats. Captain's chairs in the XLT Premium version replace the center bench, reducing seating positions to seven. Cargo volume in the E-150 is 236.5 cubic feet, smaller than the Sprinter's 318 cubic feet but about on par with the Express.
  • Standard air conditioning
  • Available cruise control
  • Available power windows, locks and mirrors
  • Redesigned door trim panels
  • Redesigned instrument cluster
  • Optional navigation system
  • Available in-dash computer with high-speed internet access; mouse and printer can be connected


Under the Hood
When properly equipped, the E-150 van can tow as much as 7,500 pounds, while the passenger van can tow 7,100 pounds. Suspension components were upgraded for 2008, and the E-Series now has heavier-duty sway bars and larger brakes. Two engines are available for the E-150, both of which are now E85-capable in the cargo van versions.
  • 225-horsepower, 4.6-liter V-8 with 286 pounds-feet of torque
  • 255-hp, 5.4-liter V-8 with 350 pounds-feet of torque (E150, E250, E350, E450)
  • Standard four-speed automatic with overdrive
  • Optional five-speed automatic with TorqShift that maximizes low-speed torque


Safety
The E-Series adds a few more safety features to its list, including a new optional, dash-mounted front passenger airbag cutoff. The 2009 E-Series has a three-star (average) rating in rollover testing, even with standard electronic stability control.
  • Dual front airbags
  • Four-wheel-disc antilock brakes
  • Traction control and electronic stability control (standard on all wagons and recreational vans, optional on commercial vans with gasoline engines)
  • Newly available rearview backup camera
  • Optional factory-installed integrated trailer brake controller
  • Side-impact airbags not available


E-250
Rated for heavier duty than the E-150, the E-250 has the same engine choices but comes in both regular and extended lengths. Extended vans are 20 inches longer overall but have the same 138-inch wheelbase; maximum cargo volume is 275.1 cubic feet. The maximum gross vehicle weight rating for the E-250 is 8,900 pounds versus a 8,520-pound gross vehicle weight rating for the E-150. Passenger wagons aren't available in this series.
  • 255-hp, 5.4-liter V-8 with 350 pounds-feet of torque (E150, E250, E350, E450)


E-350 and E-450 Super Duty
Available in regular and extended lengths, the 350 Super Duty van has a maximum GVW of 9,500 pounds. Cutaway versions that can be used for motor homes and box vans have a GVW of 14,500 pounds. Single- and dual-rear-wheel trims are available. The E-350 passenger wagon can seat seven, eight, 11 or 12 people; extended-length vans seat 11, 12, 14 or 15 occupants.

The standard E-350 engine is a 5.4-liter V-8, and E-350 models with the 5.4-liter come standard with an electronic stability system. A 6.8-liter V-10 that generates 305 hp and 420 pounds-feet of torque can be installed with a five-speed automatic transmission in either model. E-450 extended passenger wagons can tow up to 10,000 pounds.
  • 255-hp, 5.4-liter V-8 with 350 pounds-feet of torque (E150, E250, E350, E450)
  • 305-hp, 6.8-liter V-10 with 420 pounds-feet of torque (E-350 van/wagon)
  • 235-hp, 6.0-liter diesel V-8 with 440 pounds-feet of torque (E-350 van, E-350/E-450 cutaway)

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4 Trims Available

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Wondering which configuration is right for you?
Our 2009 Ford E250 trim comparison will help you decide.
 

Ford E250 Articles

2009 Ford E250 Safety Ratings

Crash-Test Reports

Recalls

There are currently 19 recalls for this car.


Safety defects and recalls are relatively common. Stay informed and know what to do ahead of time.

Safety defects and recalls explained

Service & Repair

Estimated Service & Repair cost: $4,100 per year.

Save on maintenance costs and do your own repairs.

Warranty Coverage

Bumper-to-Bumper

36mo/36,000mi

Powertrain

60mo/60,000mi

Roadside Assistance Coverage

60mo/60,000mi

What you should get in your warranty can be confusing. Make sure you are informed.

Learn More About Warranties

Warranties Explained

Bumper-to-Bumper

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

Powertrain

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

Roadside Assistance

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

Free Scheduled Maintenance

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

Other Years