Consumer Reviews

Read or write a review.

1987 Volkswagen Vanagon

1987 Volkswagen Vanagon

3.0
Average based on 1 review
Comfort
Performance
Exterior Styling
Interior Design
Value for the Money
Reliability
1-1 of 1 reviews

TOP TEN REASONS TO BUY THIS VEHICLE

by from Come to Erie, PA and Enjoy Beautiful Presque Isle on August 1, 2006

TOP TEN REASONS TO BUY THIS VEHICLE 10. It's a Volkswagen (Fahrfahrgnugen!) 9. There's more in maintenance and repair costs in this bus than you probably paid for your last car 8. Listen to t...
TOP TEN REASONS TO BUY THIS VEHICLE 10. It's a Volkswagen (Fahrfahrgnugen!) 9. There's more in maintenance and repair costs in this bus than you probably paid for your last car 8. Listen to them truckers on the 40 channel CB & learn something 7. Oh! If these seats could talk 6. It has a heater (and air conditioner, too) 5. Not made in China 4. Been to 14 States, District of Columbia and Canada (Have you?) 3. Taliban drive Toyotas, wannabee's drive Mercedes but real men drive Volkswagens 2. If you love wiener schnitzel, bratwurst and real German beer, you'll love this baby And the #1 Reason to Buy This Vehicle: 1. Never owned by a serial killer! SyncroNized-During the early 80's, VW formed a research coalition with Audi and Porsche to create an automobile drive train that would revolutionize the industry. Here is how it works: The Syncro Van normally drives the rear wheels. There is, however, a drive shaft coming out of the front of the transaxle going to the front of the van where it attaches to a viscous coupling which is attached to the front differential driving the front wheels. The VC is a clutch like device which locks up if there is a difference in speed between its input and output shafts. The rear wheels normally drive the car with almost no power transmitted through the VC to the front differential. However, should the rear wheels start to turn a different speed than the front wheels (slipping in snow, ice, etc.), the VC instantaneously locks up sending power to the front wheels. It stays locked as long as front and rear wheels try to turn at different speeds. As soon as full traction is regained, all wheels are turning at the same speed the VC relaxes and, once again, power goes to the rear wheels. This is why this vehicle requires 4 identical tires on all wheels. "SYNCRO" is the name VW gave to this new All Wheel Drive (AWD). All versions of the Syncro AWD vehicles can be considered particularly "rare" as: (1) very few total vehicles were manufactured and perhaps more importantly (2) very few people are aware that such vehicles exist. Based on the data I have reviewed, it is likely that there were less than 500 Vanagon Syncros manufactured for and sold in the U.S. in 1987. This particular vehicle, known as "The Red Baron" is production #53,074 manufactured at the Graz, Austria VW plant.
Comfort
Performance
Handling
Exterior Styling
Interior Design
Features
Value for the Money
Reliability

Purchased a used car

Does recommend this car

4 out of 4 people found this review helpful. Did you?