We test drove a Trofeo, the top-of-the-line Toronado for 1988. Withconcealed headlamps and wraparound lights, the Toronado is the best lookingand probably most distinctive E-body.

But the ``it`s too small`` damage is done. In 1990, Olds plans to stretch the Toronado about 9.5 inches, which will allow the carmaker to freshen thestyling and increase interior room and trunk space.

Until then, Olds has performed minor surgery to re-create interest in the car. For `88, Trofeo gets a power boost. The 165 horsepower 3800 version ofthe 150 h.p. 3.8 V-6 engine is under the hood. The 3800 is teamed with 4-speedautomatic. The zero-to-60-mile-an-hour time is 11 seconds.

With the FE3 sports suspension, Trofeo is nimble. The handling is firmenough to hug the road in corners and turns, yet not so stiff it jars yourteeth on tar marks. You`ll take those turns and corners without lots of swing,wandering or body roll.

Four-wheel antilock brakes are a recommended option ($925) to providequick, straight-line stopping regardless of what`s on the pavement.

Nice touches inside include the grab-handle shift lever and the pop upcoin-cup holder in the center console. New for `88 is an oil gauge indexreadout in the instrument panel that tells the motorist how much useful lifethe oil has left before a change.

This may be the last year Olds uses the Trofeo name on its top-of-the-line Toronado. Trofeo was first used last year to denote something out ofthe ordinary in the Toronado line. But you can expect the car to fall underthe International Series designation soon.

The compact Cutlass Calais and midsize Cutlass Ciera and Cutlass Supremefor 1988 have International Series versions that represent the performancemodels in each.

Base price of the Trofeo is $22,695, up $762 from `87. But we stronglyrecommend that you ask for the V1Z option.