2018 Ford Mustang: What's the Cost of a Fill-Up?

2018 Ford Mustang

CARS.COM — Gas prices have risen four weeks in a row, and the national average for regular was $2.54 on Thursday, so maybe a V-8 engine in a car like the 2018 Ford Mustang isn't the best choice right now.

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The alternative to a V-8 in the Mustang used to be a V-6 that delivered so-so performance. Now, though, there's a turbocharged 2.3-liter four-cylinder with 310 horsepower and higher fuel economy than the 5.0-liter V-8 or the discontinued 3.7-liter V-6.

  • A new 10-speed automatic transmission helps boost the EPA combined city/highway estimate for the 2.3-liter engine to 25 mpg, up 1 mpg from 2017, when a six-speed automatic was offered.
  • With the optional Performance Package, the combined rating for the four-cylinder Mustang drops to 23 mpg (convertibles have lower EPA ratings, and some models with the six-speed manual differ).
  • That's still better than a V-8 Mustang, which has a combined estimate of 19 mpg with the 10-speed automatic. (All models are engineered to burn regular gas, which means you pay $39.37 to fill the tank up from empty at the current national average for regular.)

The AAA Daily Fuel Gauge Report Thursday said regular has gone up 11 cents and premium gas 8 cents over the last month. At $2.54, regular was 21 cents higher than a year ago and premium, at $3.07, was 24 cents higher; diesel fuel, at $2.94, was 41 cents higher. Rising oil prices and increased demand for gas in the U.S. have combined to drive up pump prices.

Price increases were widespread the past week, with the biggest jumps in Indiana and Kansas (6 cents) and in Florida (9 cents). Ohio was an exception: Regular dropped 6 cents to $2.43, a dose of relief after prices had climbed 18 cents over the previous three weeks. Hawaii had the highest average price for regular, $3.33, followed by California, $3.18, and Alaska, $3.08. The lowest statewide average Thursday was in Texas at $2.28; Alabama, at $2.29, was the only other state under $2.30.

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