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2020 Kia Niro Gets Freshened-Up Face, Telluride Tech

2020 Kia Niro

The 2020 model year brings a light refresh to the Kia Niro, adding new technology and exterior tweaks to the fuel-efficient subcompact SUV. The plug-in hybrid version of the Niro will also receive the same changes.

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The overall shape of the Niro remains the same, but the front and rear get some enhancements that add detailing and definition. A new grille is flanked by updated headlights and LED daytime running lights; the lower portion of the bumper has been widened to appear more aggressive; and 16- and 18-inch alloy wheels wear new designs. Out back, the Niro’s faux rear skid plate (“faux” because it won’t actually protect you from much) has been widened and the LED taillights have a new pattern.

Of greater consequence are the interior updates: An 8-inch touchscreen is now standard (up from last year’s 7-inch screen) with a 10.25-inch touchscreen optional. That’s the same screen we saw debut earlier this year in the Kia Telluride, and it’s great to see it start to trickle down to the brand’s smaller vehicles, including the 2021 Kia Seltos, which also makes its U.S. debut in Los Angeles. Additional available features for 2020 include paddle shifters for active regenerative braking control, an electronic parking brake and mood lighting with six color options.

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2020 Kia Niro

The Niro’s driver assistance technology gets a boost with available lane centering and lane keep assist, as well as high-beam assist.

Fuel-economy figures appear to be unchanged for the 2020 Niro, which tops out at an EPA-estimated 52/49/50 mpg city/highway/combined for the most fuel-efficient trim level. Other trim levels get less, dropping to as low as 46/40/43 mpg.

Pricing information is not yet available for the 2020 Niro or the Niro PHEV. Kia says pricing info will be released closer to the on-sale date for both vehicles in early 2020.

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