2021 Kia Sorento Hybrid Puts a Premium on Efficiency

2021 Kia Sorento Hybrid

After announcing pricing for gas-only versions of its redesigned 2021 Sorento earlier this week, Kia is back with pricing for the hybrid version of its mid-size three-row SUV. Available in either S or EX trims, the 2021 Sorento HEV uses a combination of a turbocharged 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine and electric motor for 227 (S) or 228 (EX) total system horsepower. Opting for the hybrid’s EPA-estimated 37 combined mpg will come at a premium of either $1,700 for the S or $1,600 for the EX when compared to their gas-only counterparts.

Related: Pricing Slides Higher for Redesigned 2021 Kia Sorento

With just two trim levels, pricing for the hybrid Sorento is straightforward:

  • 2021 Kia Sorento HEV S: $34,760 (gas-only S: $33,060)
  • 2021 Kia Sorento HEV EX: $37,760 (gas-only EX: $36,160)

All prices include a destination fee of $1,170.

Options for the hybrid Sorento include the usual bevy of accessories like cargo mats and roof rails, along with a $1,500 rear entertainment system and a $475 trailer hitch. Throw in every accessory and a premium paint color, and a Sorento HEV S will crest $40,000, while the EX will creep toward the cost of a fully loaded gas-only SX Prestige X-Line at around $43,000.

Outside of the Kia family, there are few one-to-one comparisons for a Sorento hybrid. Toyota offers a bevy of hybrid choices, but the Venza is only a two-row SUV, as are the RAV4 Hybrid and RAV4 Prime plug-in hybrid, and all three would be better classified as compact SUVs. They also all have fully loaded prices close to or higher than $40,000. The larger three-row Highlander Hybrid, meanwhile, can surpass $50,000, and while it’s on the small side for a three-row SUV, it’s also larger than the Sorento.

The 2021 Sorento and Sorento HEV will be on sale soon, with a plug-in hybrid version to follow sometime in 2021.

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