NEWS

2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee 2-Row’s Updates Come at a Cost, But No 4xe Pricing Yet

jeep-grand-cherokee-2022-jp022-105gc-angle-exterior-front-suv-white 2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee | Manufacturer image

Jeep revealed the updated two-row 2022 Grand Cherokee in late September, showcasing new styling, tech and a first-ever plug-in hybrid variant. With so much changed (check the related link below for details), it’s no surprise that the 2022 Grand Cherokee will cost more than the previous generation. The base 4×2 Laredo will start at $39,185 for the 2022 model year, $2,130 more than a comparable 2021 model.

Related: 2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee Goes High-Tech, Gets Hybrid

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2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo
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2022 Jeep Grand Cherokee Limited
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The 2022 Grand Cherokee will be available in five trim levels: Laredo, Limited, Trailhawk, Overland and Summit. Laredo models are available with an Altitude option package, while the Summit can be made even more opulent with the Summit Reserve Package.

Pricing and Release Date

Full pricing is below, including the $1,795 destination fee (up $200 for 2022). Adding four-wheel drive costs an extra $2,000; opting for the V-8 adds $3,295 for the Overland, Summit and Trailhawk; and the two main option packages cost $4,555 (Altitude) or $4,000 (Summit Reserve), respectively. Models should go on sale by the end of 2021.

  • Grand Cherokee Laredo (4×2 V-6): $39,185 ($2,130 increase)
  • Grand Cherokee Laredo (4×4 V-6): $41,185 ($2,105 increase)
  • Grand Cherokee Limited (4×2 V-6): $45,505 ($2,350 increase)
  • Grand Cherokee Limited (4×4 V-6): $47,505 ($2,330 increase)
  • Grand Cherokee Trailhawk (4×4 V-6): $53,070 ($4,660 increase)
  • Grand Cherokee Trailhawk (4×4 V-8): $56,365 ($4,560 increase)
  • Grand Cherokee Overland (4×2 V-6): $55,100 ($5,305 increase)
  • Grand Cherokee Overland (4×4 V-6): $57,100 ($4,275 increase)
  • Grand Cherokee Overland (4×4 V-8): $60,395 ($4,175 increase)
  • Grand Cherokee Summit (4×2 V-6): $59,160 ($3,290 increase)
  • Grand Cherokee Summit (4×4 V-6): $61,160 ($2,260 increase)
  • Grand Cherokee Summit (4×4 V-8): $64,455 ($1,660 increase)

What You Get

Engine choices for the non-PHEV 2022 Grand Cherokee are either a 290-horsepower, 3.6-liter V-6 or a 357-hp, 5.7-liter V-8. Grand Cherokees with the V-6 can be either rear- or four-wheel drive (except for the 4WD-only Trailhawk), while V-8 models are exclusively 4WD. The Grand Cherokee 4xe arrives later and will use a PHEV powertrain, pairing a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder gas engine with a 17.3-kilowatt-hour battery pack and electric motor to send 375 hp and 470 pounds-feet of torque to all four wheels.

The base Laredo is only available with the V-6 and includes a 10.25-inch digital gauge cluster and 8.4-inch touchscreen display, eight-way power driver’s seat and 17-inch wheels, and spending $2,000 gets you the less-advanced Quadra-Trac I 4WD system. The $4,555 Altitude Package for the Laredo adds black exterior accents and black 20-inch wheels, heated front seats and steering wheel, and more.

Move up to the Limited and buyers will get features like Capri leather upholstery, an eight-way power driver’s seat and four-way power front passenger seat with memory settings, a heated steering wheel, heated front and rear seats, and remote start. Limited 4WD models get the Selec-Terrain traction management system in addition to Quadra-Trac I 4WD.

The Trail Rated off-road Trailhawk model is exclusively available with 4WD and is the lowest trim that can be powered by the optional 5.7-liter V-8. It comes standard with an adjustable Quadra-Lift air suspension and Jeep’s most advanced Quadra-Drive II 4WD system with an electronically controlled limited-slip differential. The Trailhawk also includes Jeep’s Off-road Pages feature in its touchscreen display to help manage things off the beaten path, as well as a host of additional off-road enhancements including 18-inch wheels wearing Goodyear Wrangler Territory all-terrain rubber.

Above the Trailhawk is the Overland, which comes standard with the mid-level Quadra-Trac II 4WD system with a two-speed transfer case, though Quadra-Drive II is optional as part of a Trail Rated Off-Road Group. The air suspension is also standard, as is Nappa leather upholstery and wood trim. Twenty-inch wheels are standard, but the Trail Rated Group replaces those with 18s wrapped in all-terrain tires. Additional standard comfort and convenience features include ventilated front seats with length-adjustable front cushions and a hands-free power liftgate.

At the summit of the Grand Cherokee lineup is the Summit trim (obviously), particularly with its optional Summit Reserve Package. The Summit includes 16-way power front seats with massage functions, Nappa leather upholstery and oak wood trim (including on the steering wheel). Four-zone climate control is also standard. The Summit rides on 20-inch wheels and includes a host of advanced safety features including Jeep’s Active Driving Assist, a 360-degree camera system and parking assist.

Opt for the Summit Reserve Package and for an additional $4,000, you’ll get even nicer Palermo leather upholstery with open-pore walnut wood trim, ventilated front and rear seats, a suedelike headliner, a premium 19-speaker McIntosh stereo and 21-inch wheels. The Summit Reserve is exclusively available with 4WD.

Where’s the 4xe? Or the SRT? Or the Trackhawk?

The PHEV Grand Cherokee 4xe will be available in Limited, Trailhawk, Overland and Summit trims, and Jeep says pricing will be announced closer to its on-sale date in early 2022. Expect prices to be higher than non-PHEV versions, at least before any available tax credits are applied. As for the high- and higher-performance SRT and Trackhawk, we still haven’t received word if those variants will become available later.

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