NEWS

2023 BMW i4 eDrive35 Joins i4 Lineup With Lower Price, Less Power and Range

BMW continues to expand its all-electric vehicle portfolio with the 2023 i4 eDrive35, which joins the eDrive40 and M50 variants of the i4 sedan (or “Gran Coupe,” according to BMW). As the name suggests, the eDrive35 is the new base model in the i4 lineup, with a single electric motor driving the rear wheels. The eDrive35 will have less power and range than the eDrive40 and M50, but it also comes with a lower starting price.

Related: BMW: New Subscription Fees for Heated Seats Won’t Impact U.S.

The good news is that the eDrive35 has the same standard equipment as the pricier eDrive40, according to BMW, including a connected, single-surface 12.3-inch touchscreen display and 14.9-inch digital gauge cluster. BMW estimates the eDrive35 will have a maximum of 260 miles of total range with the standard 18-inch wheels, and while official EPA estimates aren’t available for the 2023 eDrive40 and M50, the 2022 versions topped out at 301 and 270 miles, respectively.

The single electric motor in the eDrive35 will power the rear wheels and produce 281 horsepower and 295 pounds-feet of torque, propelling the eDrive35 from 0-60 mph in an estimated 5.8 seconds. Compare that to 335 hp and 317 pounds-feet with an estimated 0-60 of 5.5 seconds for the eDrive40, and 536 hp and 583 pounds-feet with an estimated 0-60 of 3.7 seconds for the M50.

Pricing for the eDrive35, with deliveries set for the first quarter of 2023, will start at $52,395, including a $995 destination fee — but not including any applicable federal, state or local tax credits for which BMWs are still eligible. The 2023 i4 eDrive40, meanwhile, is priced from $56,895, and the M50 starts at $68,295. The benchmark in the electric sedan segment, the Tesla Model 3, is priced at $48,190 for a rear-wheel-drive model with 267 miles of range as of this writing (Tesla changes its prices far more frequently than most automakers).

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