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But Wait, There's More: 2020 Toyota Corolla Gets a Hybrid, Too

2020 Toyota Corolla Hybrid

Fresh off revealing the completely redesigned 2020 Corolla, Toyota announced that a hybrid version would also be part of the new Corolla line — the first hybrid Corolla ever available to U.S. shoppers.

Related: 2020 Toyota Corolla Sedan Snags Hatch Looks, Leaves Powertrains

The move makes sense given the Corolla shares a platform with the Prius hybrid and Toyota has many hybrid variants of mainstream models. It will be interesting to see how a Corolla hybrid affects Prius popularity going forward, particularly with the latter rumored to get a (much-needed) facelift in the near future.

Details are scant so far. Estimated fuel economy figures for the new non-hybrid Corolla haven't been released yet, though Toyota promises increased fuel efficiency over the outgoing model. For comparison, the new 2019 Toyota Corolla Hatchback with the 2.0-liter four-cylinder and continuously variable automatic transmission offers up to 32/42/36 mpg city/highway/combined in EPA estimates for the SE version (it's a few mpg lower for the XSE), while the outgoing 2019 Corolla sedan gets 30/40/34 mpg with the 1.8-liter four-cylinder and CVT in its most efficient LE Eco trim. However the 2020 Corolla's ratings end up, expect the hybrid version's mileage to be higher.

Related: 2020 Toyota Corolla Promises Style, Tech

Toyota's teaser image suggests styling isn't likely to stray too much from what we've already seen of the new Corolla, except the badges will have Toyota's signature blue ring to indicate a hybrid.

Full details of the Corolla hybrid will be available in its debut at the 2018 Los Angeles Auto Show, which Toyota will also livestream here. Stay tuned for Cars.com's coverage during the show.

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