Cars.com’s 2020 Hyundai Palisade: Here’s What Our First Service Visit Cost

2020 Hyundai Palisade

The miles have piled on. Since Cars.com purchased its latest long-term editorial vehicle and Best of 2020 winner, the all-new Hyundai Palisade, we’ve already racked up more than 4,000 miles. That drew a maintenance reminder, courtesy of the Palisade’s companion phone app — curiously early, we thought, given typical new-car maintenance intervals range from 7,500 miles to as much as 15,000 miles.

Related: We Bought a Hyundai Palisade: See How Much We Paid

Indeed, the Palisade’s owner’s manual calls for regular maintenance, including an oil and filter change, every 7,500 miles under a normal driving schedule. The interval drops to 3,750 miles under a severe schedule.

We initially wondered whether the app was pulling real-time diagnostics to peg us on a severe maintenance schedule via Hyundai’s Blue Link telematics service, but that doesn’t appear to be the case: “Blue Link doesn’t talk to the [instrument] cluster,” Hyundai spokesman Miles Johnson wrote in an email. Such a schedule in Hyundai’s online owner’s portal should be “whatever was set by the dealer,” Johnson said.

Indeed, our portal pegged us on a severe schedule based on a few pre-selected driving habits we could check or uncheck. The first time we viewed the selectable driving habits, various boxes had already been checked to put us on the severe schedule. Uncheck them, and our maintenance interval doubled to 7,500 miles.

Which schedule did we fit? Our owner’s manual stipulates any of nearly a dozen circumstances — among them repeated short trips, extensive idling or low-speed driving, and driving in very cold or hot weather — constitute a severe driving schedule. Based in Chicago, Cars.com editors are no strangers to extreme temperatures and heavy traffic, two of the many triggers. So we scheduled an appointment.

To minimize chances of preferential treatment, we used a separate dealer from where we purchased the Palisade and gave personal contact info unrelated to Cars.com. The next day, we pulled into the service bay with 4,443 miles on the Palisade’s odometer. Beyond needing an oil change, our Palisade had developed a squeak from the seating tracks for the driver-side captain’s chair in the second row, so we asked the service department to address that as well.

Impressively, Hyundai’s owner’s portal cleared our maintenance alert while we were in the dealership’s waiting room, just half an hour after we pulled in. That’s a far cry from Cars.com’s prior long-term vehicle, a 2019 Genesis G70 sedan from Hyundai’s stand-alone luxury brand. Back then, the portal continued warning us the G70 needed service a full two weeks after our visit, only clearing the alert after we raised the issue to Hyundai’s public relations department.

For the Palisade, our only quibble involves a difference of intervals. Hyundai’s portal says we’ll need service again in 3,056 miles — reflecting about 7,500 total miles, or the service interval under severe driving if we’d brought the Palisade in at exactly 3,750 miles — while the dealership’s windshield sticker says 8,193 miles, or 3,750 miles beyond the Palisade’s current mileage. We’ll likely service it somewhere between the two.

More From Cars.com:

The total for a conventional oil and filter change, plus a mechanical inspection, came to $49.59. We just missed eligibility for Hyundai’s new free-maintenance program, which was unveiled in February. The program applies to cars starting with the 2020 model year, but only purchases after Feb. 1, 2020, qualify. We bought our Palisade in December 2019.

Our service rep said his technicians couldn’t replicate the squeaking second-row seat, which we’d observed on the way to the dealership, but they lubricated the tracks all the same, and we haven’t heard any squeaking since. That came at no charge. Also free was to be a car wash, but outside temperatures were 22 degrees, and dealership’s equipment had frozen. It seems our Palisade wasn’t the only thing facing severe duty.

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

 
Related Articles