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Does the 2019 BMW Z4 Atone for the Sins of Its Predecessor?

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Cars.com Los Angeles Bureau Chief Brian Wong is a selfish jerk who keeps all the nice weather to himself during the terrible winter months we experience at Cars.com’s headquarters in Chicago. That warmer climate also enabled him to be the first of our staff to get behind the wheel of the 2019 BMW Z4 recently in Palm Springs, Calif., and put the roadster through its paces.

Related: Here’s Everything We Know About the 2019 BMW Z4 Roadster

Wong is right to point out that calling the 2019 Z4 all-new isn’t quite accurate as there was previously a Z4 in BMW’s lineup, though they’ve been absent for a bit. According to Wong, that’s because the previous Z4 lacked the fun-to-drive experience one would expect to find in a two-seat roadster. In addition, the Z4 of old had styling that lacked cohesion.

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The 2019 Z4 gets praise from Wong for its styling, and rightfully so. It’s a handsome car, with attractive proportions and a nice mix of aggressiveness and luxury for a car that can be pushed and driven aggressively but doesn’t always need to be.

Speaking of aggression, the version of the Z4 in this video is the sDrive30i, which will be the first type of Z4 to go on sale in March. It’s powered by a turbocharged 2.0-liter four-cylinder engine paired with an eight-speed automatic; the turbo four produces 255 horsepower and 295 pounds-feet of torque. A more powerful M40i version will go on sale later in 2019.

Another goodie on Wong’s test car was the optional adaptive suspension that can be adjusted to varying levels of stiffness depending on the driver’s desire. BMW also claims the Z4 has a nearly 50/50 weight distribution.

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How did the powertrain perform? What’s it like to throw the Z4 around some of California’s twisty roads? You’ll have to watch the video to find out.

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