Hyundai Beefs Up Standard Safety Tech for 2019 Ioniq Lineup

2019 Hyundai Ioniq

Hyundai is making advanced safety and driver aid tech with added features standard on more models as well as enhancing connectivity services for the 2019 versions of its Ioniq line of electrified cars.

Related: 2018 Hyundai Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid: Real-World Fuel Economy

The Ioniqs are mechanically carried over for the new year and include hybrid and plug-in hybrid versions, as well as a battery electric model currently available only in California.

Newly standard for the hybrid's middle SEL trim level, the volume version, is a bundle of safety and driver-assistance features that includes automatic emergency braking with pedestrian detection, adaptive cruise control, lane departure warning, lane keep assist, a blind spot monitor and rear cross-traffic alert. A new driver attention alert is being added to that suite. All are standard for 2019 on the hybrid's top Limited trim level, which also adds a new high-beam assist, as well as on the Limited version of the plug-in hybrid and electric.

Owners of 2019 Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid and Electric cars now will be able to manage and monitor their charging schedule remotely using the Hyundai Blue Link app on their smartphones or by voice command via Amazon Alexa or Google Home devices.

And 2019 Ioniqs equipped with in-car navigation systems will get enhanced, server-based voice recognition technology with a point-of-interest search database provided by location data company Here that includes charging stations.

The Ioniq Hybrid's base Blue trim level has an EPA rating of 58 mpg combined, the highest U.S. combined rating for a non-plug-in car. The Ioniq Plug-In Hybrid is rated 52 mpg combined as a hybrid and also has an estimated electric range of 29 miles on a full charge. The Ioniq Electric is rated for an estimated 124-mile driving range. You can get more details on their EPA ratings here.

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