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Wanna Buy a 2020 Toyota 86, 4Runner, Land Cruiser, Sequoia or Tundra? Here’s What It’ll Cost Ya

2020 Toyota 86 Hakone Edition

Toyota’s updated 2020 4Runner, Sequoia and Tundra, as well as the special edition Land Cruiser Heritage Edition SUV and 86 Hakone Edition coupe, now have pricing information. Most of those vehicles made their debuts at the 2019 Chicago Auto Show in February, with the Hakone Edition 86 bowing in April.

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The Heritage Edition Land Cruiser gets a host of cool cosmetic upgrades to honor 60 years of Toyota’s iconic off-roader. The loveliest Land Cruiser will cost you $89,040, including a $1,395 destination fee. The Hakone Edition 86 is painted in a beautiful British Racing Green and features bronze wheels, a nice-looking two-tone tan and black interior, along with some additional creature comforts. There are no significant performance upgrades (it is a Toyota 86, after all). Prices for it will be $30,825 for the six-speed manual version or $31,545 for the automatic ($955 destination charge included).

The 4Runner, Sequoia and Tundra now all have standard safety tech across every trim, as well as upgraded tech features. The bigger changes for the bunch include a new TRD Pro trim for the Sequoia and the return of an extended-cab version of the Tundra TRD Pro. The 4Runner will start at $37,140, with the range-topping TRD Pro version costing a cool $50,885 (prices include a $1,120 destination charge). At $65,425, the new Sequoia TRD Pro will cost less than a loaded Platinum version at $67,340 for a Platinum 4×2 or $70,565 for a Platinum 4×4 (prices include a $1,395 destination charge). The Tundra sees price increases across the board, and ranges from $35,020 for an extended-cab base SR model to $54,375 for the TRD Pro (prices include a $1,595 destination charge).

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