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Which New Cars Have Manual Transmissions?

ford-bronco-2021-01-exterior--profile--yellow.jpg 2021 Ford Bronco | Cars.com photo by Evan Sears

Cars with manual transmissions have become an endangered species — but don’t declare them extinct just yet. Automakers still feature the three-pedal setup, if rarely, in today’s new or redesigned cars.

Related: Which Cars Have Manual Transmissions for 2020? 

The resurrected Ford Bronco SUV, for example, arrives with an available seven-speed manual, and Toyota offers a manual in its recently redesigned Corolla with some trick features to ease operation. Indeed, Toyota not only kept the stick shift alive for the Corolla, but it also did so for the Tacoma pickup truck and GR 86 sports car, the latter skipping the 2021 model year but returning for 2022 with a six-speed manual. 

ford-bronco-concept-37-center-console--center-stack--climate-control--front-row--gearshift--interior.jpg Ford Bronco manual transmission | Manufacturer image

Honda, on the other hand, has nixed the Civic Si coupe for 2021 and killed the Fit hatchback, both of which offered manuals. Shoppers looking to buy a 2021 Accord or Civic sedan with a stick shift will also be forced to look to a different model (or model year), as these cars no longer come with their former six-speed manuals. Other vehicles that go automatic-only for 2021 include the Hyundai Venue and Jeep Compass.

toyota-corolla-hatchback-2021-oem.jpg 2021 Toyota Corolla | Manufacturer image

Excluding high-end exotics, the Toyota Corolla is one of 36 nameplates that offer a manual for the 2021 model year — a clear minority of the 300-plus models on sale overall. Predictably, the three-pedal holdouts proffer stick shifts either as a cost-saving feature on affordable trim levels or a purist’s choice among performance cars. Here’s the full list of cars with manual transmissions, either as standard or optional equipment, for 2021:

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