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Which Vehicles Have the Best Warranty Coverage?

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With average new-vehicle prices nearing $50,000 (the average listing price of new cars on Cars.com was $49,096 in January) and buyers stretching to afford them, the new-car warranty is even more important insurance against unexpected expenses that could sink a family’s budget. Many new cars have expensive-to-fix components you might not have had on a previous new car, such as hybrid systems, sophisticated electronics or high-voltage batteries.

Related: Which 2023 Vehicles Have the Best Warranty Coverage?

That makes it even more important that shoppers pay attention to a vehicle’s warranty to know what’s covered and for how long. There is no standard, and new-car warranties can vary a lot. One difference is duration, specified as the number of years or miles from your vehicle’s delivery date; your vehicle’s coverage ends with whichever one you hit first. Duration is particularly important if you also are still making payments on the vehicle — the average new-car loan length was more than 68 months in 2023, according to data company Experian. Some warranties allow unexpired coverage to pass to a new owner if you sell or gift the vehicle, but others don’t.

Beyond overall duration, a given vehicle might have separate durations for different equipment. Every new-vehicle warranty also lists exceptions and exclusions — that’s why it’s called a limited warranty — and certain aftermarket equipment or vehicle modifications might cause warranty problems. You’ll need to check these details to avoid surprises down the road.

Most warranties also make you responsible for keeping up with scheduled maintenance. You don’t have to do it at the dealer, but if you don’t, it’s important to keep your own records. The warranty does not pay for scheduled maintenance, though some automakers and dealers offer separate complimentary scheduled maintenance programs.

Types of Warranties

New-car warranties typically have four main areas of coverage that might differ in length:

Bumper-to-Bumper

Sometimes called the basic warranty, this warranty covers the whole vehicle with the exception of normal wear items, such as filters, wiper blades and brake pads. There typically is separate coverage for rust and for tires, which are covered by a tiremaker warranty.

Powertrain

This is coverage, often for more time/miles, just for engine, transmission and drivetrain components. It can also include components in drive systems for electric vehicles and gas-electric hybrids.

Roadside Assistance

Details and duration can vary, but this will get you help if a problem leaves you stranded.

Emissions Equipment and High-Voltage Batteries

These parts and their performance levels are a warranty area subject to federal and state regulations, which can vary depending on the state in which the vehicle is sold. The most expensive component covered by such rules are the high-voltage battery packs in hybrid, plug-in hybrid and all-electric vehicles.

For all-electric vehicles, federal rules require coverage against failure for eight years or 100,000 miles, and some automakers offer longer coverage. But all battery packs lose capacity over time and only some battery warranties also protect against that loss, typically guaranteeing the battery will retain at least 70% or 75% of its original capacity over the years of the warranty. This is an important coverage area since total battery failure is rare but loss of capacity is a given.

For many hybrids and PHEVs that are bought in California and some of the 17 other states following California’s emissions rules, increased high-voltage battery coverage is required for 10 years or 150,000 miles (Toyota has already adopted that nationwide). Where specified, this coverage is noted in the list below.

Best Warranties

These warranties are more generous than others in both bumper-to-bumper and powertrain coverage. Note, however, that the longer powertrain warranties are for the original owner; for subsequent owners, the coverage drops back to the same limits as the transferable bumper-to-bumper warranty.

Fisker

Bumper-to-bumper and roadside assistance coverage for the brand’s vehicles runs for six years or 60,000 miles, while powertrain and battery coverage is for 10 years or 100,000 miles for at least 75% battery capacity retention.

Hyundai, Genesis, Kia

Bumper-to-bumper coverage is for five years or 60,000 miles; powertrain coverage runs for 10 years or 100,000 miles; and roadside assistance extends five years with unlimited mileage (or 60,000 miles for Kia). Genesis also offers additional maintenance and service coverage. The drive battery and drive system components for EVs and hybrids are covered for 10 years or 100,000 miles, with EV battery capacity retention of at least 70%.

Mitsubishi

Bumper-to-bumper coverage runs five years or 60,000 miles. Powertrain coverage is for 10 years or 100,000 miles, including for the powertrain and drive battery for the Outlander Plug-in Hybrid SUV, but there is no provision for loss of battery capacity. Roadside assistance coverage runs for five years with no mileage cap.

Rivian

Bumper-to-bumper and roadside assistance coverage runs for five years or 60,000 miles for quad-motor versions of the make’s vehicles and four years or 50,000 miles for other configurations. Powertrain and battery pack coverage is for eight years or 175,000 miles for quad-motor models; eight years or 150,000 miles for dual-motor models with the Large or Max battery; and eight years or 120,000 miles with the Standard or Standard+ battery. All cover battery capacity retention of at least 70%.

Above-Average Warranties

Just below the best, these warranties offer better-than-average coverage in one or more areas.

Acura

Bumper-to-bumper and roadside assistance runs four years or 50,000 miles, and powertrain coverage runs six years or 70,000 miles. The high-voltage battery in the ZDX EV is covered for eight years or 100,000 miles.

Cadillac

Bumper-to-bumper coverage is for four years or 50,000 miles, with powertrain and roadside assistance running six years or 70,000 miles. EV batteries (along with EV towing assistance) are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles with battery capacity retention of at least 75%.

Ineos

Bumper-to-bumper and powertrain coverage runs for five years or 60,000 miles.

Infiniti

Bumper-to-bumper coverage is for four years or 60,000 miles, and powertrain coverage is for six years or 70,000 miles. Roadside assistance runs for four years with no mileage cap.

Jaguar

Bumper-to-bumper, powertrain and roadside assistance all run five years or 60,000 miles. EV batteries are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles with 70% battery capacity retention.

Lexus

Bumper-to-bumper coverage is for four years or 50,000 miles, and powertrain coverage is for six years or 70,000 miles. Hybrid system components are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles, and hybrid batteries are covered for 10 years or 150,000 miles. Roadside assistance lasts four years with no mileage cap for the first owner.

Lincoln

Bumper-to-bumper coverage runs four years or 50,000 miles, with powertrain coverage for six years or 70,000 miles and roadside assistance with no caps for the first owner. Hybrid system components and batteries are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles (the battery duration in California and some states following California emissions rules is 10 years/150,000 miles).

Tesla

Bumper-to-bumper and roadside assistance coverage is for four years or 50,000 miles. Coverage for electric drive units and battery packs runs eight years or 150,000 miles on the Model S, Model X and Cybertruck; eight years or 120,000 miles on the Model 3 and Model Y Long Range and Performance variants; and eight years or 100,000 miles on the Model 3 Standard or Standard Range Plus variants. All battery warranties are for capacity retention of at least 70% over the warranty period.

Industry-Average Warranties

These brands offer industry-average coverage. For mainstream brands, that generally means bumper-to-bumper coverage for three years and powertrain backing for five years; premium brands tend to average four years for both. Both groups usually include a period of roadside assistance.

Alfa Romeo

This Stellantis luxury brand offers bumper-to-bumper and powertrain coverage for four years or 50,000 miles and roadside assistance for four years with no mileage cap. Tonale PHEV batteries are covered for eight years/100,000 miles.

Audi

This Volkswagen luxury brand offers bumper-to-bumper and powertrain coverage for four years or 50,000 miles and roadside assistance for four years with no mileage limit. Coverage is eight years or 100,000 miles for Audi’s EV and PHEV batteries.

BMW

Bumper-to-bumper and powertrain coverage runs four years or 50,000 miles, and roadside assistance lasts for four years with no mileage cap. High-voltage batteries in EVs and PHEVs are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles (hybrid battery duration in California and some California emissions rules states is 10 years/150,000 miles).

Buick

Bumper-to-bumper coverage is for three years or 36,000 miles, and powertrain coverage and roadside assistance is for five years/60,000 miles.

Chevrolet

Chevy offers bumper-to-bumper coverage for three years or 36,000 miles, and powertrain coverage and roadside assistance for five years or 60,000 miles. EV traction batteries and towing assistance are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles.

Chrysler

Bumper-to-bumper coverage is for three years or 36,000 miles, plus powertrain and roadside assistance coverage for five years or 60,000 miles. High-voltage Pacifica PHEV batteries are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles (10 years or 150,000 miles in California and some California emissions rules states).

Dodge

Bumper-to-bumper coverage runs for three years or 36,000 miles, and powertrain and roadside assistance coverage is for five years or 60,000 miles. Hornet PHEV batteries are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles.

Fiat

Bumper-to-bumper and powertrain coverage is for four years or 50,000 miles, and roadside assistance is for four years with no mileage cap. The 500e’s battery is covered for eight years or 100,000 miles.

Ford

Bumper-to-bumper coverage runs three years or 36,000 miles, with powertrain and roadside assistance extending to five years or 60,000 miles; diesel engines are covered for five years or 100,000 miles. Hybrid and EV system components and batteries are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles (hybrid battery duration in California and some California emissions rules states is 10 years or 150,000 miles).

GMC

This GM brand offers bumper-to-bumper coverage for three years or 36,000 miles, and powertrain coverage and roadside assistance for five years or 60,000 miles. Diesel and TurboMax gasoline powertrains get five years or 100,000 miles. The batteries for the electric GMC Hummer Pickup and Hummer SUV are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles with at least 75% capacity retention.

Honda

Bumper-to-bumper and roadside assistance coverage runs three years or 36,000 miles, while powertrain coverage lasts five years or 60,000 miles. Hybrid and Prologue EV batteries are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles.

Jeep, Wagoneer

Bumper-to-bumper coverage is for three years or 36,000 miles, plus powertrain and roadside assistance coverage for five years or 60,000 miles. High-voltage batteries for 4xe PHEV models are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles (10 years or 150,000 miles in California and some California emissions rules states).

Land Rover

Bumper-to-bumper, powertrain and roadside assistance coverage lasts four years or 50,000 miles. PHEV batteries are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles.

Lucid

Bumper-to-bumper and roadside assistance coverage lasts four years or 50,000 miles, while powertrain and EV battery coverage is for eight years or 100,000 miles with at least 70% battery capacity retention.

Mazda

Bumper-to-bumper and roadside assistance coverage runs three years or 36,000 miles, and powertrain coverage lasts five years or 60,000 miles. The CX-90 PHEV model’s high-voltage battery is covered for eight years or 100,000 miles with battery capacity retention of at least 70% (hybrid battery duration in California and some California emissions rules states is 10 years or 150,000 miles).

Mercedes-Benz

Mercedes’ bumper-to-bumper, powertrain and roadside assistance coverage is for four years or 50,000 miles. Plug-in hybrid batteries are covered for six years or 62,000 miles (10 years or 150,000 miles in California and some California emissions rules states). Coverage for the batteries in Mercedes-EQ EVs varies, with the EQS Sedan and SUV and EQE Sedan and SUV covered for 10 years or 155,000 miles with battery capacity retention of at least 70%, while the EQB SUV is covered for eight years or 100,000 miles.

Mini

Bumper-to-bumper and powertrain coverage is for four years or 50,000 miles, and roadside assistance coverage is for four years with no mileage cap. High-voltage batteries in Mini EVs and plug-in hybrids are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles.

Nissan

Bumper-to-bumper and roadside assistance coverage is for three years or 36,000 miles, while powertrain coverage, including EVs, runs five years or 60,000 miles. Leaf and Ariya EV batteries are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles with capacity retention of at least nine segments on the vehicle’s 12-segment battery capacity gauge. The Titan pickup truck gets bumper-to-bumper, roadside assistance and powertrain coverage with a duration of five years or 100,000 miles.

Polestar

Bumper-to-bumper coverage for the brand’s vehicles is four years or 50,000 miles, while roadside assistance is provided for four years with no mileage cap. Batteries and electric drive components are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles with battery capacity retention of at least 70%.

Porsche

VW’s performance brand offers bumper-to-bumper, powertrain and roadside assistance coverage for four years or 50,000 miles. Coverage is eight years or 100,000 miles for hybrid and EV batteries; the EV battery coverage also is for 80% capacity retention for three years and 70% for eight years.

Ram

Bumper-to-bumper coverage runs for three years or 36,000 miles, and gasoline powertrain and roadside assistance coverage is for five years or 60,000 miles. Ram heavy-duty diesel powertrain and roadside assistance coverage is for five years or 100,000 miles.

Subaru

Bumper-to-bumper coverage and roadside assistance are for three years or 36,000 miles, while powertrain coverage lasts five years or 60,000 miles. Hybrid components, including the battery, are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles. The Solterra EV’s electric drive components and drive battery are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles with battery capacity retention of at least 70%.

Toyota

Bumper-to-bumper coverage runs three years or 36,000 miles, while powertrain coverage lasts five years or 60,000 miles. Roadside assistance is covered for two years with no mileage cap (three years with no cap for the bZ4X EV). Hybrid-related components are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles, and hybrid batteries are covered for 10 years or 150,000 miles. The bZ4X EV’s electric drive components and battery are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles with battery capacity retention of at least 70%.

Volkswagen

VW provides four years or 50,000 miles of bumper-to-bumper and powertrain coverage, with three years or 36,000 miles of roadside assistance. Coverage for the ID.4 EV’s traction battery runs eight years or 100,000 miles.

Volvo

Bumper-to-bumper and powertrain coverage is for four years or 50,000 miles. Roadside assistance is covered for four years with no mileage limit, plus unlimited free towing to a Volvo dealer. Hybrid and EV batteries are covered for eight years or 100,000 miles.

More From Cars.com:

What About Extended Warranties?

So-called “extended warranties” cover a vehicle’s problems after the original new-vehicle warranties expire. Most dealers will try to sell you one at the time of purchase or later; it’s a profitable add-on for which they get a commission. The extended warranty might be backed by the automaker, a third party or even the individual dealer. You might also later get sales pitches by phone or email for an extended warranty around the time your original warranty is expiring.

In most cases, these products provide specified coverage for an additional fixed number of years or miles. They are not actually an extension of the original warranty, but a separate insurance policy that might or might not cover all of the same potential problems. Cars.com has more information here to help you decide whether one is right for you.

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

Photo of Fred Meier
Former D.C. Bureau Chief Fred Meier, who lives every day with Washington gridlock, has an un-American love of small wagons and hatchbacks. Email Fred Meier

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