2006 Maserati Spyder

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Key Specs

of the 2006 Maserati Spyder base trim shown

Our Take

From the Cars.com Vehicle Test Team

The Good

  • Handling
  • Appearance
  • Heritage
  • Gratifying overall experience

The Bad

  • Cambiocorsa transmission operation
  • Limited dealer network
  • Visibility with top up
  • Noise and vibration

Notable Features of the 2006 Maserati Spyder

  • 390-hp, 4.2-liter V-8
  • Cambiocorsa sequential manual transmission
  • Skyhook suspension system

2006 Maserati Spyder Overview

By Cars.com Editors
Vehicle Overview
Maserati had been out of the U.S. market for a decade when the renowned Italian builder of exotic sports cars returned for the 2002 model year with a brand-new Spyder convertible.

The Spyder project began after Ferrari took control of Maserati in 1997. The two-seater's styling is credited to Italdesign-Giugiaro, one of the top Italian design firms, and Ferrari handles the car's marketing in the U.S. Little has changed for the 2006 model year.

At the 2004 Paris Motor Show, Maserati unveiled a 90th Anniversary edition of the Spyder that featured aerodynamic carbon-fiber parts. Only 90 were to be available in the U.S., and 90 more would be produced for the rest of the world. A mild update for 2005 included a larger grille and two-tone interiors.


Exterior
Modern touches blend with traditional sports-car styling in the Spyder, which rides on 18-inch wheels. A contemporary version of the historic oval Maserati shield appears on the hood and is positioned above a familiar trident on the grille. Arch-type roll bars are installed, and the power top operates electrohydraulically. Weight distribution is 53/47 percent front to rear.

A Skyhook automatic suspension control system was developed with Mannesmann-Sachs. Sensors constantly monitor the movement of the wheels and body, and a computer adapts damping according to driving and road-surface conditions.


Interior
Ten shades of leather upholstery for the handcrafted interior are available. Each seat is powered and ...
Vehicle Overview
Maserati had been out of the U.S. market for a decade when the renowned Italian builder of exotic sports cars returned for the 2002 model year with a brand-new Spyder convertible.

The Spyder project began after Ferrari took control of Maserati in 1997. The two-seater's styling is credited to Italdesign-Giugiaro, one of the top Italian design firms, and Ferrari handles the car's marketing in the U.S. Little has changed for the 2006 model year.

At the 2004 Paris Motor Show, Maserati unveiled a 90th Anniversary edition of the Spyder that featured aerodynamic carbon-fiber parts. Only 90 were to be available in the U.S., and 90 more would be produced for the rest of the world. A mild update for 2005 included a larger grille and two-tone interiors.


Exterior
Modern touches blend with traditional sports-car styling in the Spyder, which rides on 18-inch wheels. A contemporary version of the historic oval Maserati shield appears on the hood and is positioned above a familiar trident on the grille. Arch-type roll bars are installed, and the power top operates electrohydraulically. Weight distribution is 53/47 percent front to rear.

A Skyhook automatic suspension control system was developed with Mannesmann-Sachs. Sensors constantly monitor the movement of the wheels and body, and a computer adapts damping according to driving and road-surface conditions.


Interior
Ten shades of leather upholstery for the handcrafted interior are available. Each seat is powered and has an integral head restraint, and a memory feature for the driver is standard.

An information center features a 5.8-inch color display. Electronic rear-parking sensors are available.


Under the Hood
The Spyder's 4.2-liter V-8 develops 390 horsepower at 7,000 rpm and 333 pounds-feet of torque at 4,500 rpm. An electronically actuated six-speed-manual Cambiocorsa gearbox with four modes — Normal, Sport, Automatic and Low Grip — is offered. It can operate in fully automatic mode, or the driver can manipulate paddles behind the steering wheel to change gears. A conventional six-speed manual is also available.

Safety
Standard safety features include side-impact airbags, electronic brake-force distribution and traction control. All-disc antilock brakes were developed with the Brembo company.

Driving Impressions
Except for the harsh-shifting Cambiocorsa transmission, the stylish Spyder delivers a satisfying and exhilarating road experience. Once you learn how to tame it a bit, the Spyder performs with real gusto.

A heavy throttle foot in automatic mode can make downshifts horrid. When you first step on the gas, the Spyder seems reluctant to move; when it does, the car likes to lurch ahead.

Noise and vibration are abundant at idle, but the Spyder rides rather comfortably. The seats are pleasantly supportive, but some of the gauges are difficult to read. Impaired over-the-shoulder visibility with the top up can make merging into traffic worrisome.



Latest 2006 Spyder Stories

What Drivers Are Saying

Exterior Styling
(5.0)
Performance
(5.0)
Interior Design
(5.0)
Comfort
(5.0)
Reliability
(5.0)
Value For The Money
(5.0)

Latest Reviews

(5.0)

Just What We Were Looking For

by Love convertables from Wilson,N.C. on May 8, 2014

We have been looking for about a year. This one felt right, and the dealership felt right, too. The vehicle drove very good, and did not look it's year. Very clean, well kept. The salesman was very ... Read full review

Safety & Recalls

Recalls

The 2006 Maserati Spyder currently has 0 recalls

Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2006 Maserati Spyder has not been tested.

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Spyder received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker