2005 Mitsubishi Endeavor

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Key Specs
Our Take
Overview
Photos
Reviews
Safety & Recalls
Warranty & CPO
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Key Specs

of the 2005 Mitsubishi Endeavor. Base trim shown.

Our Take

From the Cars.com Vehicle Test Team

The Good

  • Interior space
  • Easy maneuverability
  • Ride comfort
  • Automatic-transmission operation
  • Visibility

The Bad

  • Interior materials
  • No transfer case

Notable Features of the 2005 Mitsubishi Endeavor

  • 225-hp V-6
  • FWD or AWD
  • Standard side-impact airbags

2005 Mitsubishi Endeavor Overview

By Cars.com Editors
Vehicle Overview
Shortly after introducing its compact Outlander sport utility vehicle, Mitsubishi added a larger "crossover" SUV. Similar in size to the automaker's seven-passenger Montero, the midsize Endeavor is intended primarily for on-road motoring. A dual-range transfer case is not included, so offroad capabilities are limited.

A mid-2004 update gave the Endeavor an additional 10 horsepower and more standard features, including a tire-pressure monitor and daytime running lights. For 2005, all models get seat-mounted side-impact airbags and the XLS edition adds an anti-theft system.

Three trim levels are available: the LS, midrange XLS and top-of-the-line Limited. Each is offered with either front- or all-wheel drive.


Exterior
Mitsubishi describes the exterior as "sophisticated, intimidating, yet handsome." A particularly bold front end features a louvered grille that leads to accent lines along the hood. Large wheel openings and creased wheel arches are present. Cast-aluminum wheels hold 17-inch tires.

The Endeavor rides a 108.3-inch wheelbase and has 8.3 inches of ground clearance. The bumper garnish is black on the LS, chrome-plated on the XLS and body-colored on the Limited, which also features fog lamps. The Endeavor has a fully independent suspension and all-disc brakes. A power sunroof is standard on the Limited.


Interior
Five occupants fit inside the Endeavor. Rear passengers get a 60/40-split, folding backseat. Cargo capacity behind the rear seat is 40.7 cubic fe...
Vehicle Overview
Shortly after introducing its compact Outlander sport utility vehicle, Mitsubishi added a larger "crossover" SUV. Similar in size to the automaker's seven-passenger Montero, the midsize Endeavor is intended primarily for on-road motoring. A dual-range transfer case is not included, so offroad capabilities are limited.

A mid-2004 update gave the Endeavor an additional 10 horsepower and more standard features, including a tire-pressure monitor and daytime running lights. For 2005, all models get seat-mounted side-impact airbags and the XLS edition adds an anti-theft system.

Three trim levels are available: the LS, midrange XLS and top-of-the-line Limited. Each is offered with either front- or all-wheel drive.


Exterior
Mitsubishi describes the exterior as "sophisticated, intimidating, yet handsome." A particularly bold front end features a louvered grille that leads to accent lines along the hood. Large wheel openings and creased wheel arches are present. Cast-aluminum wheels hold 17-inch tires.

The Endeavor rides a 108.3-inch wheelbase and has 8.3 inches of ground clearance. The bumper garnish is black on the LS, chrome-plated on the XLS and body-colored on the Limited, which also features fog lamps. The Endeavor has a fully independent suspension and all-disc brakes. A power sunroof is standard on the Limited.


Interior
Five occupants fit inside the Endeavor. Rear passengers get a 60/40-split, folding backseat. Cargo capacity behind the rear seat is 40.7 cubic feet, which grows to 76.4 cubic feet when the seat is folded down. The back window opens independently of the liftgate.

At night, the center controls emit blue backlighting. The XLS is equipped with such extras as premium cloth upholstery, a power driver's seat and a 315-watt stereo with a six-CD changer. Leather seating surfaces and backseat climate controls are installed in the Limited edition.


Under the Hood
The Endeavor's 3.8-liter V-6 generates 225 hp and 255 pounds-feet of torque. The four-speed-automatic transmission incorporates a Sportronic manual-gear-change provision. Models with all-wheel drive have a viscous coupling. Towing capacity is 3,500 pounds in all-wheel-drive Endeavors equipped with the Towing Prep Package.

Safety
Antilock brakes are optional on the front-drive LS and standard on all other versions. Side-impact airbags are standard. An Active Skid and Traction Control electronic stability system is optional on the all-wheel-drive Limited.

Driving Impressions
Overall, the Endeavor is a surprisingly enjoyable vehicle of manageable size. It handles with a light touch and maneuvers with agility in corners. Ride quality beats the class norm, thanks to a somewhat cushiony suspension.

The V-6 engine delivers a satisfying burst of power when needed for passing. Mitsubishi's automatic transmission yields prompt, confident responses that are devoid of awkwardness.

Visibility is great all around. Front headroom is good, even in models equipped with a sunroof. The seats are softly cushioned, with only modest bolstering and mediocre support. Backseat space is roomy at the sides and tolerable in the center. The interior looks a little on the cheap side with a rough edge or two, but the controls are clear and the gauges are easy to read.



Latest 2005 Endeavor Stories

Consumer Reviews

Exterior Styling
(4.4)
Performance
(4.5)
Interior Design
(4.0)
Comfort
(4.9)
Reliability
(4.5)
Value For The Money
(4.5)

What Drivers Are Saying

(3.0)

Transmission issue

by Disappointed 19 from Bloomer on October 13, 2018

We like the car, very comfortable. But at 124,000 the transmission needs to be replaced and everything on the vehicle is RIDICULOUSLY expensive. The blower fan also went out at the same time. Read full review

(5.0)

Super Reliable

by Ramon Reyes from Cagua PR on February 7, 2017

Amazing, I've never had to take a mechanic in 12 years. Basic maintenance only. My only complain its about the painting. Not durable. Read full review

Safety & Recalls

Recalls

The 2005 Mitsubishi Endeavor currently has 6 recalls

IIHS Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

Based on 2005 Mitsubishi Endeavor LS

IIHS rates vehicles good, acceptable, marginal, or poor.

Moderate overlap front

Chest
good
Head/Neck
acceptable
Left Leg/Foot
good
Overall Front
good
Restraints
good
Right Leg/Foot
acceptable
Structure/safety cage
good

Other

Bumpers
marginal
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is a nonprofit research and communications organization funded by auto insurers.

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Endeavor received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker