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2002 Pontiac Montana

2002 Pontiac Montana

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$594 — $4,602 USED

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2002 Pontiac Montana Review

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

Vehicle Overview
Pontiac’s minivan used to be front-wheel-drive only, but Versatrak all-wheel drive is available on the 2002 model. This year’s Montana can also be equipped with an optional DVD-based video entertainment system for middle and rear passengers; it includes wireless remote control and wireless headphones.

Built from the same design as the Chevrolet Venture and Oldsmobile Silhouette, the Montana looks sportier than its GM mates. All three date back to 1990 and were redesigned for the 1997 model year. Pontiac’s version used to be called the Trans Sport. Regular- and extended-length versions are available.

Montana sales fell by 17 percent during 2001 to 49,416 units, according to Automotive News. This season’s buyers can dress up the extended-wheelbase minivan with a new Thunder Sport Package that includes a rear spoiler, 16-inch chrome wheels, two-tone leather interior and a fully independent suspension.

Exterior
Regular-length Montanas have a 112-inch wheelbase, measure 187.3 inches long overall and stand 67.4 inches tall. Extended-length models ride a 121-inch wheelbase, stretch to nearly 201 inches and stand 68.2 inches high, without the roof rack. Measurements are close to those of the Dodge Caravan and Grand Caravan.

All Montanas have dual-sliding side doors. A power-operated passenger-side door is optional, while one for the driver’s side also is available on higher-end models. All Montanas come with a luggage rack and an optional automatic load leveling syste...

Vehicle Overview
Pontiac’s minivan used to be front-wheel-drive only, but Versatrak all-wheel drive is available on the 2002 model. This year’s Montana can also be equipped with an optional DVD-based video entertainment system for middle and rear passengers; it includes wireless remote control and wireless headphones.

Built from the same design as the Chevrolet Venture and Oldsmobile Silhouette, the Montana looks sportier than its GM mates. All three date back to 1990 and were redesigned for the 1997 model year. Pontiac’s version used to be called the Trans Sport. Regular- and extended-length versions are available.

Montana sales fell by 17 percent during 2001 to 49,416 units, according to Automotive News. This season’s buyers can dress up the extended-wheelbase minivan with a new Thunder Sport Package that includes a rear spoiler, 16-inch chrome wheels, two-tone leather interior and a fully independent suspension.

Exterior
Regular-length Montanas have a 112-inch wheelbase, measure 187.3 inches long overall and stand 67.4 inches tall. Extended-length models ride a 121-inch wheelbase, stretch to nearly 201 inches and stand 68.2 inches high, without the roof rack. Measurements are close to those of the Dodge Caravan and Grand Caravan.

All Montanas have dual-sliding side doors. A power-operated passenger-side door is optional, while one for the driver’s side also is available on higher-end models. All Montanas come with a luggage rack and an optional automatic load leveling system that prevents the rear of the vehicle from sinking down when heavily loaded.

Interior
The Montana is more versatile inside than some minivans; it can be fitted for six to eight passengers. Bucket seats go up front, and the second row of a regular-length Montana may be equipped with bucket seats or captain’s chairs. Twin buckets or a split, folding three-passenger bench seat can go in the third row.

Extended-length models may have captain’s chairs and a rear bench to seat seven or front buckets and two bench seats in the second and third rows to accommodate eight occupants. Extended models can have a stowable third-row seat with a floor-mounted convenience center. Cargo capacity is 119.8 cubic feet for regular-length models and 140.7 cubic feet for the extended version.

Standard equipment includes a CD player, power windows and door locks, remote keyless entry and dashboard-mounted cupholders. Options include an in-dash six-CD changer and a HomeLink universal garage door opener.

An ultrasonic rear parking assist system is optional for extended-length models; it gives an audible warning if you get too close to an obstacle while backing up. GM’s OnStar communication system is standard or optional, depending on the model. An optional MontanaVision DVD-based video entertainment features a fold-down, 7-inch screen and onscreen programming.

Under the Hood
Like its cousins from Chevrolet and Oldsmobile, the Montana uses a 185-horsepower, 3.4-liter V-6 engine and a four-speed-automatic transmission. Versatrak AWD is offered only on extended-length Montanas.

Safety
Standard side-impact airbags for the front seats provide head and chest protection. Antilock brakes and puncture-sealing tires are standard on all models. Traction control is available in a Sport Performance and Handling Package. Outboard seating positions in the second row are fitted with lower anchors for child-safety seats.

Driving Impressions
Because their powertrains are identical, the driving experience in a Montana isn’t markedly different from that of the Venture or Silhouette, despite the Pontiac’s sportier appearance. All three minivans have improved since their 1997 debuts, especially in terms of second-row seating comfort.

Even though the presence of Versatrak AWD isn’t evident in ordinary driving, it gives a feeling of added confidence just in case the road gets slippery. An AWD Montana rides comfortably, handles capably and is on par with most rivals — it even scores better than some.

The Montana’s performance is a strong point, as GM’s solid powertrain functions with impressive competence. Each of these GM minivans is energetic when starting from a standstill, and they pass and merge effectively.

None of GM’s vehicles stand much taller than the ever-tightening competition, including the latest versions of the Dodge and Chrysler minivans. But because differences among the available models tend to be slight, they’re well worth a test drive.

 

Reported by Jim Flammang  for cars.com
From the cars.com 2002 Buying Guide

Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

4.1
12 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(4.6)
Performance
(4.3)
Interior Design
(4.4)
Comfort
(4.2)
Reliability
(3.8)
Value For The Money
(4.2)

Read reviews that mention:

(5.0)

Best bang for the buck

by Gene Wedde from Wautoma WI on February 17, 2019

This is the 3rd Montana I have had and they are great UNTIL the head gaskets fail. I have hauled 1700 pounds of payload and gotten 24 mpg doing it so they are like an enclosed pick-up truck. Good ... Read full review

(5.0)

Runs really smooth

by D.C. on September 13, 2017

It runs really smooth. Only have to give it up because I got a new one. Would recommend this to friends. Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2002 Pontiac Montana currently has 0 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2002 Pontiac Montana has not been tested.

Latest 2002 Montana Stories

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Montana received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker

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