2019 Toyota Corolla Hatchback Video Review

The Toyota Corolla iM is gone. It’s been replaced by the Corolla Hatchback, a nameplate that loses the iM designation from Toyota’s bygone Scion division for something that shoppers will actually understand now. There’s more that’s changed than just the name: The Corolla Hatchback rides an all-new platform, and it’s actually a different platform from what’s underneath the current Toyota Corolla sedan.
 
 
If the Corolla iM always looked like it was trying a little too hard to be cool, the Corolla Hatchback actually has a sort of dynamic simplicity to it. It looks good in its own skin and not like it’s trying too hard to be anything.
 
You get some interesting styling traits up front: The upper and lower openings to the bumper are conjoined within the grille’s framework, but at least there’s a body-colored strip at the bottom that underpins the whole thing. On the Corolla sedan there’s just a dark area that makes it seem endless. The headlights are sets of LED strips that run all the way inboard to the grille.
 
Overall length and wheelbase are both increased about an inch and a half, and the Corolla Hatchback is lower and wider than the Corolla iM.
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Watch the video above for the rest of my impressions on the new 2019 Toyota Corolla Hatchback. We’ll have to drive it to see if it improves upon the underwhelming experience of its predecessor, which is likely to happen closer to its on-sale date of summer 2018.
 
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