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2019 VW Jetta Scores Big Boost in Mileage Ratings

2019 Volkswagen Jetta

CARS.COM — The redesigned 2019 Volkswagen Jetta has gotten its official gas mileage report card from the EPA, and it has pulled up its combined score to 34 mpg. That’s up 2 mpg from the previous model and is more directly competitive with efficiency rivals among non-hybrid compact cars with gasoline engines.

Related: 2019 Volkswagen Jetta Goes Classy to Stay Competitive

The official EPA tally is 30/40/34 mpg city/highway/combined for the 2019 Jetta with its standard powertrains, 2 mpg better across the board from the 28/38/32 mpg ratings for the best-mileage version of the 2018 Jetta (you can compare the new Jetta with all the 2018s here).

The rating also brings the Jetta more in line with mileage leaders among mainstream compact sedans with conventional gasoline engines and automatic transmissions. That includes such competitors as the 2018 Honda Civic at 32/42/36 mpg (with the available turbocharged 1.5-liter four-cylinder and continuously variable automatic transmission), the 2018 Chevrolet Cruze (29/40/33 mpg), the 2018 Toyota Corolla (28/36/32 mpg) and the special, higher-mileage Eco model of the 2018 Hyundai Elantra (32/40/35 mpg). You can compare their ratings here.

All 2019 Jetta models at launch this spring will use a standard 147-horsepower, turbocharged 1.4-liter four-cylinder mated to a new eight-speed automatic or a six-speed manual. Unlike for many vehicles, the EPA lists the ratings as the same for the manual as the automatic. In addition to the new automatic, powertrain tweaks include a clutch-driven air conditioner, a more efficient generator and a standard stop-start system.

Among measures VW used to lower air drag and boost the seventh-generation Jetta’s mpg ratings are active grille shutters, “air curtains” in the front bumper to reduce turbulence around the front wheels, underbody coverings and aerodynamic rear styling. The Jetta models also have new low rolling-resistance tires.

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