2017 Volkswagen Jetta

Change Year or Vehicle
$17,895–$27,895 MSRP range

Key Specs

of the 2017 Volkswagen Jetta base trim shown

Our Take

From the Cars.com Vehicle Test Team

The Good

  • Excellent base engine
  • Confident handling, steering
  • Quiet interior
  • Adult space for two in rear seat
  • Trunk like a mid-size car
  • Up-to-date media system

The Bad

  • Interior materials quality
  • Dated interior design
  • Limited interior storage
  • Small, low multimedia display
  • Front collision system on only one trim
  • Sporty Jetta GLI pricey for class
2017 Volkswagen Jetta exterior side view

Notable Features of the 2017 Volkswagen Jetta

  • Five-seat compact sedan
  • Lineup trimmed to four models
  • Backup camera now standard
  • Apple CarPlay, Android Auto standard on all but base trim
  • Three engine choices
  • Manual and automatic transmissions

2017 Volkswagen Jetta Road Test

https://www.cstatic-images.com/stock/64x64/92/img-915736090-1457635858692.jpg
Fred Meier
The Verdict:

The Jetta isn't the trendiest or flashiest compact sedan out there (by far), but it's one of the most satisfying to drive.

Versus The Competition:

Almost a stealth entry in the segment, the Jetta SE quietly holds its own against many newer compact sedans.

Volkswagen's Jetta compact sedan is like an old friend — familiar and aging well, but aging nonetheless. The current generation was launched with great fanfare as a 2011 model (VW had Katy Perry dance on the hood in New York City's Times Square). It was a Jetta redone for American tastes (and sales), replacing the European model that had been a little too small and expensive for the U.S. market versus mainstream compact rivals.

That model's cheaper interior materials and other cost-cutting factors were justifiably criticized for creating a car that was less special, yet "good enough" for Americans. But it brought more buyers, so maybe the Germans were right.

The car has improved a lot since then, though mostly in how it drives rather than what you see or touch. It's good enough now for the budget-priced 2017 Jetta SE to have earned fourth place versus seven mostly newer rivals in Cars.com's 2017 Compact Sedan Challenge. In that contest, it scored within the leader group that included 2017 versions of the Honda Civic, Kia Forte and Subaru Impreza over a second tier that included the Toyota Corolla, Hyundai Elantra, Mazda3 and Chevrolet Cruze.

The SE ($22,815 with destination as tested) was more fun to drive than most similarly priced rivals; it might have finished higher if it delivered a little more curb appeal.

Form Follows Function

If you liked the restrained, conservative look of the 2011 Jetta, you'll ...

Volkswagen's Jetta compact sedan is like an old friend — familiar and aging well, but aging nonetheless. The current generation was launched with great fanfare as a 2011 model (VW had Katy Perry dance on the hood in New York City's Times Square). It was a Jetta redone for American tastes (and sales), replacing the European model that had been a little too small and expensive for the U.S. market versus mainstream compact rivals.

That model's cheaper interior materials and other cost-cutting factors were justifiably criticized for creating a car that was less special, yet "good enough" for Americans. But it brought more buyers, so maybe the Germans were right.

The car has improved a lot since then, though mostly in how it drives rather than what you see or touch. It's good enough now for the budget-priced 2017 Jetta SE to have earned fourth place versus seven mostly newer rivals in Cars.com's 2017 Compact Sedan Challenge. In that contest, it scored within the leader group that included 2017 versions of the Honda Civic, Kia Forte and Subaru Impreza over a second tier that included the Toyota Corolla, Hyundai Elantra, Mazda3 and Chevrolet Cruze.

The SE ($22,815 with destination as tested) was more fun to drive than most similarly priced rivals; it might have finished higher if it delivered a little more curb appeal.

Form Follows Function

If you liked the restrained, conservative look of the 2011 Jetta, you'll recognize the 2017 — even if you have a hard time picking it out in a parking lot. The shape translates into an ample rear seat for two adults, rivaling the Impreza's top-of-the-class backseat. At 6-foot-2, I could sit behind a front-seat occupant my size but wasn't comfortable in the middle due to an intrusive console between the front seats. The console at least includes cubbies and 12-volt power for the rear, but sadly no air-conditioning vents.

The Jetta's exterior shape also makes for a 15.7-cubic-foot trunk, rivaling mid-size cars (a 2017 Toyota Camry has 15.4 cubic feet, for example). The trunk is well-designed for convenience, with a lid that pops all the way up when you press the key fob, plus both a center pass-through and a 60/40-split folding backseat for extra room.

If you were OK with the earlier Jetta's nicely grained but brittle plastic pieces inside, you'll be fine with the 2017 SE; the SEL and GLI have some softer-touch panels. I didn't mind them, except for the hard door trim against my arm, but the overall design and trim looks dated versus newer, jazzier rivals. And as it has from the start, the interior also suffers by comparison to the love VW lavishes on its Golf's cabin — the Jetta appears to be the neglected American stepchild.

The Jetta's heavy, perforated imitation leather on the seats (newly standard on the SE for 2017) looks more serviceable than the cloth you get in most compacts at this price. I found it to be comfortable, but you'll never mistake it for the Mazda3's soft, is-it-or-isn't-it faux leather. The two-tone cloth in the base S is your only other choice; even the pricey GLI doesn't offer real leather.

The SE's front driver's seat is manually adjustable six ways, plus lumbar. I managed to find a just-so position, but it would have been easier to do if the big side levers were less clunky to operate (the SEL and GLI have a power seat). The Jetta SE's front seats are also heated, a feature that was not universally standard in the budget-price Challenge cars.

The dash layout is simple and logical, offering buttons and knobs (thank you, VW!) that make common functions intuitive, unlike sleeker but harder-to-use systems that rely on small and distracting touch-sensitive panels and touchscreen menus, such as the Honda Civic's. The Jetta, however, lags behind the Civic when it comes to front cabin storage, offering a just-adequate device tray and a small center console bin versus the Honda's large and clever new configurable bin.

The Jetta is also notably lacking such pizzazz as the Civic's new digital color gauge display, the Forte's sculpted dashboard and the Mazda3's classy trim. Even Subaru, known for simpler designs, is looking more up-to-date with its redesigned 2017 Impreza.

One Jetta touch does stand above the crowd: its chunky, leather-wrapped, flat-bottom steering wheel with controls. It's now standard on the SE for 2017, and it's a joy to hold.

Less Flash, More Dash

Thanks to changes in recent years, the Jetta's engine lineup now is state-of-the-art. The 170-horsepower, turbocharged 1.8-liter four-cylinder that was added for 2014 powers the SEL; 2016 brought a sophisticated new 150-hp, turbo 1.4-liter for the base S and the SE we drove.

That punchy little turbo proves that an economy compact's base engine doesn't have to be coarse, noisy or unsatisfying. Its 184 pounds-feet of torque comes on with gusto at a low 1,400 rpm, and the six-speed automatic seems well-tuned to exploit its available power for a nimble feel. Shifts were positive, though kickdown to lower gears was sometimes a little rough. A five-speed manual (not tested) is available on the S and SE. Also not tested was the upscale GLI's powertrain. That's the performance choice: a 210-hp, 2.0-liter turbo four mated to a six-speed manual or six-speed dual-clutch automatic.

The SE with the 1.4-liter is the pick if gas mileage is a priority. With the automatic, it's EPA-rated 28/38/32 mpg city/highway/combined — substantially higher than the SEL's 1.8-liter (available only with the automatic), which is rated 25/35/29 mpg. Compare all Jetta powertrains here.

The Jetta SE finished in the middle of the pack among eight rivals in our 2017 Compact Car Challenge real-world mileage drive without resorting to the less satisfying continuously variable automatic transmission used by three of them.

Planted and Composed

People don't buy Jettas looking for sports cars, but the Jetta plays above most compact sedans, which generally range from acceptable to sloppy. It feels planted and composed in corners, and steering is precise and not overly boosted. In fact, for driving fun, the Jetta challenges the Mazda3, which is arguably the compact sedan to beat. It's held back only by its high-mileage but low-grip Bridgestone Ecopia tires. And the Jetta is a more practical package, with much more rear-seat and trunk space than the Mazda.

The Jetta SE doesn't make you pay in terms of ride comfort: Its suspension and high-sidewall 205/55 tires on 16-inch alloy wheels soaked up the bumps. The SEL gets 17-inch wheels, while the GLI comes with 18-inchers plus a sport suspension.

At Last, a USB Port

The Jetta finally has an up-to-date multimedia system and a USB connection (as of 2016). If size matters to you, the 6.3-inch screen in the SE and higher trims is not as impressive as its rivals; six of our eight Challenge cars had 7-inch displays. But the Jetta's screen is crisp and colorful, and it provides a sharp backup camera image. It's positioned a bit low on the dash for my eyes, but the Jetta's knobs for volume, tuning and buttons that supplement the touchscreen for most-used functions limit your need to look down.

Better still, the SE's system is fast to boot up and quick to respond, and it includes standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone integration (for navigation and more), as well as HD and satellite radio capability and support for lossless audio files. Move up to the SEL and you'll get navigation and two more speakers, for a total of six. The GLI adds VW's excellent Fender premium audio with eight speakers and a subwoofer.

One low-tech nit to pick: While the rest of the world has mastered designing a little door to cover the 12-volt power port, VW continues to plug the hole with a lighter-shaped (remember lighters?) plastic knob. If it rattles around while you use the outlet, don't worry; you'll eventually lose it. But there's a lower-tech plus for those of you still carting around retro music or books on CDs: Jetta's updated system still has a slot for you, bucking the trend.

Safety Technology, With Asterisks

The Jetta earned top scores in the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety's crashworthiness tests, and a rating of advanced (out of a possible none, basic, advanced or superior) for its forward collision warning system with automatic emergency braking, which is standard on the SEL but not offered on the most expensive, GLI trim. This quirk is also true for the adaptive cruise control system. Neither is offered on the lower-priced S and SE, either. Blind spot warning and rear cross-traffic alert are standard on SE and higher trims for 2017. All models have a backup camera standard.

Some of the Jetta's compact sedan rivals offer wider availability of forward collision systems; Toyota has it standard on every Corolla and will expand it to most of its vehicles by 2018. The Civic, Mazda3 and Forte all had such systems on cars under the price cap of $23,000 for our 2017 Compact Car Challenge.

Buying Considerations

The Jetta holds up well against mostly newer competitors that deliver more style and more upscale interior bits (at least for this category). The Jetta delivers more driving satisfaction than most, plus a grown-up backseat, a mid-size car's trunk and newly competitive multimedia technology. Compare it with compact sedan sales leaders, including the Civic, Corolla and Cruze, here.

As for which Jetta offers more value, the Challenge showed the SE to be a solid choice among affordable compacts. But the $3,000 bump from an SE with automatic transmission to an SEL (automatic standard) seems a reasonable trade up for more power, added interior conveniences and, most important, a competitive suite of electronic safety technology. The sporty GLI, however — at around $30,000 — seems a little rich despite having more features and performance. It has a lot of competition at that price, too, including the well-equipped, more sophisticated and sportier 2017 Volkswagen Golf GTI.


Latest 2017 Jetta Stories

What Drivers Are Saying

Exterior Styling
(4.7)
Performance
(4.7)
Interior Design
(4.6)
Comfort
(4.7)
Reliability
(4.8)
Value For The Money
(4.8)

Latest Reviews

(5.0)

End of the model year deal......................

by ezshift5 from Sacramento, CA on April 11, 2018

Following backpack of my JSW TDI 6M, I REALLY got a deal (and a half) after going thru a bunch of VW dealers in the great central valley of California. After just under 7 grand odometer, Fuelly dot ... Read full review

(5.0)

Jetta 1.4 is an awesome car for the dough

by jetta2017 from charlottesville, VA on April 4, 2018

I bought this car because I had a VW TDI that was bought back from VW. We are VW loyal and it is one of the few new cars you can buy with a manual transmission, a must for me. And it gets great gas ... Read full review

Safety & Recalls

Recalls

The 2017 Volkswagen Jetta currently has 4 recalls

IIHS Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

Based on 2017 Volkswagen Jetta 1.4T S

IIHS rates vehicles good, acceptable, marginal, or poor.

Child Seat Anchors (Latch)

Ease of Use
marginal

Head Restraints and Seats

Dynamic Rating
good
Overall Rear
good
Seat Head/Restraint Geometry
good

Moderate overlap front

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Left Leg/Foot
good
Overall Front
good
Restraints
good
Right Leg/Foot
good
Structure/safety cage
good

Other

Roof Strength
good

Side

Driver Head Protection
good
Driver Head and Neck
good
Driver Pelvis/Leg
good
Driver Torso
acceptable
Overall Side
good
Rear Passenger Head Protection
good
Rear Passenger Head and Neck
good
Rear Passenger Pelvis/Leg
good
Rear Passenger Torso
acceptable
Structure/safety cage
good

Small overlap front

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Headlights
acceptable
Hip/thigh
good
Lower leg/foot
good
Restraints and dummy kinematics
acceptable
Small overlap front
good
Structure and safety cage
good
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is a nonprofit research and communications organization funded by auto insurers.

Manufacturer Warranty

  • Bumper-to-Bumper

    36 months / 36,000 miles

  • Powertrain

    60 months / 60,000 miles

  • Roadside Assistance

    36 months / 36,000 miles

CPO Program & Warranty

Certified Pre-Owned by Volkswagen

Program Benefits

24-hour roadside assistance, trip-interruption services and trip-planning services

  • Limited Warranty

    Model Specific Limited Warranty Coverage*

    *See owner’s literature or dealer for your vehicle’s warranty coverage, exclusions, and limitations.
  • Eligibility

    2012 - 2017 Model Years / Less Than 75,000 miles

    Vehicles receive a 100+ point inspection and reconditioning.

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Jetta received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*

Latch or Latch system

B

Infant seat

A

Forward-facing convertible

(second row)

A

Rear-facing convertible

B

Booster

(second row)

B
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.
For complete details,

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker