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2020 BMW 2 Series Gran Coupe’s Grand Entrance Set for L.A. Auto Show

The all-new BMW 2 Series Gran Coupe isn’t set to premiere on the world stage until November, and while BMW is still hiding some of the exterior details underneath multicolored camouflage wrapping, the automaker is disclosing a bit more about what it’ll be like to drive its latest luxury compact car in 2020.

Related: Longer Wheelbase, 4 Doors Put the ‘Gran’ in 2020 BMW 8 Series Gran Coupe

First off, the 2020 BMW 2 Series Gran Coupe is not, as you’d expect, just a four-door version of the existing 2 Series coupe. It shares a lot of its technology with the recently unveiled, non-U.S. BMW 1 Series. According to BMW’s global press site, the new Gran Coupe will also be front-wheel drive, just like competitors including the Mercedes-Benz A-Class and Audi A3. And, it’ll get the electric BMW i3’s traction-control system, which is engineered to bring wheel slip under control up to 10 times faster.

At the top of the range, the BMW M235i xDrive will (as the xDrive name connotes) come with all-wheel-drive and, BMW says, the most powerful four-cylinder engine in the BMW Group lineup, making a reported 306 horsepower. Other than this tidbit, however, the automaker is quiet on engine specs.

The sedan purportedly will offer “generous levels of spaciousness,” along with improved, “state-of-the-art connectivity.” BMW indicated that it hopes the 2 Series’ four-door configuration will have similar success in the luxury compact segment as it did in higher vehicle classes — namely the 6 Series Gran Coupe. Despite those four doors, it appears the car will maintain a similar, sporty fastback look to the two-door models in the 2 Series lineup.

For the full reveal of the BMW 2 Series Gran Coupe, you’ll have to wait until its world premiere at the 2019 Los Angeles Auto Show in late November. It’ll launch to markets worldwide in spring 2020.

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