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2020 Nissan Armada: What’s Changed

2020 Nissan Armada

Most significant changes: New 22-inch wheel package that’s standard on the Platinum Reserve and optional for the Platinum; all trim levels get heated outside mirrors standard.

Price change: Base prices are unchanged on the SV and SL models, but $200 more on the Platinum and $1,700 more on the Platinum Reserve; the destination charge is unchanged at $1,395.

On sale: Now

Which should you buy, 2019 or 2020? 2019. With no significant changes aside from the 22-inch wheels and tires, a heavily discounted 2019 model would likely be the better deal.

Nissan’s Armada soldiers on into 2020 as a full-size, body-on-frame SUV that competes with the Chevrolet Suburban, Ford Expedition, Toyota Land Cruiser and similar beasts of burden.

Related: 2019 Nissan Armada Review: A Friendly Big Fella With Some Rough Edges

The biggest change for 2020 is a new 22-inch wheel-and-tire package that comes with 8-inch-wide aluminum-alloy wheels and 275/50R22 tires. The package is standard on Platinum Reserve models and a $2,250 option on Platinum models. Base prices on the Platinum Reserve models (technically option packages) jump by $1,700.

The only other announced change is that base SV models gain standard heated outside mirrors.

All versions come with a 390-horsepower, 5.6-liter V-8, seven-speed automatic transmission, a choice of rear- or four-wheel drive and standard towing capacity of 8,500 pounds. Seats for eight are standard on the SV, SL and Platinum. Two second-row bucket seats are optional on the SL and Platinum, and standard on the Platinum Reserve, for seven-occupant capacity.

The Armada boasts some impressive numbers, such as the horsepower, the towing capability and 95.4 cubic feet of cargo space with the second- and third-row seats folded. It also has snug third-row seating, and there’s surprisingly little space behind the last row for such a big SUV; the cargo-loading height also is steep.

If you need this kind of size and brawn, the Armada is worth a look, but be sure to check out some of its rivals, too.

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