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Dodge Charger Hellcat, R/T Scat Pack Get Striped and Strip-Equipped

2019 Dodge Charger | Manufacturer image 2019 Dodge Charger | Manufacturer image 2019 Dodge Charger | Manufacturer image 2019 Dodge Charger | Manufacturer image 2019 Dodge Charger | Manufacturer image 2019 Dodge Charger | Manufacturer image

A tiger may not be able to change its stripes, but apparently a Hellcat can. The 2019 Dodge Charger Hellcat adds three new stripe color options in red, blue and silver. These dual-stripe-only options join the previously available carbon and gunmetal gray choices; all can be had for an extra $995.

Related: 2019 Dodge Challenger First Drive: When Hellcat Met Demon …

But this, like Dodge’s press release, buries the lede when it comes to the real upgrades to the Charger’s abilities. For 2019, both Hellcat and R/T Scat Pack Chargers add standard launch assist and line-lock features. Launch assist improves launches by detecting any wheel hop and reducing torque without the driver having to lift from the accelerator pedal; this, in turn, reduces loads on driveline components and reduces wear on those parts. Both models also get a new grille with dual air inlets.

Shop the 2018 Dodge Charger near you

Used
2018 Dodge Charger SXT
60,626 mi.
$17,900 $1,100 price drop
Used
2018 Dodge Charger R/T
27,368 mi.
$35,999

The Charger Hellcat borrows the Torque Reserve and After-Run Chiller features from the Challenger SRT Demon. Torque Reserve helps build up supercharger boost at the line for more power from launch, while the After-Run Chiller keeps cooling fans running and coolant circulating after the engine has been shut off, reducing heat soak and getting the car ready for its next run down the drag strip sooner. Both features now are standard on the Charger Hellcat.

The only real letdown here is that the Charger Hellcat will still make “only” 707 horsepower from its 6.2-liter supercharged Hemi V-8. The 2019 Challenger Hellcat boasts 717 hp, while the Challenger Hellcat Redeye puts out 797 hp.

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Road Test Editor Brian Normile joined the automotive industry and Cars.com in 2013, and he became part of the Editorial staff in 2014. Brian spent his childhood devouring every car magazine he got his hands on — not literally, eventually — and now reviews and tests vehicles to help consumers make informed choices. Someday, Brian hopes to learn what to do with his hands when he’s reviewing a car on camera. He would daily-drive an Alfa Romeo 4C if he could. Email Brian Normile

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