Ford to Extend Production of GT Supercar

2017 Ford GT

Did you miss out on your shot to buy one of Ford's super-limited-production GT sports cars? Well, maybe you're about to get another shot at it. Ford has announced that it will be extending production of the GT for an additional two years, bringing the total number of vehicles it plans to build from a previously announced 1,000 units by 2020 up to 1,350 in total by 2022.

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This is the second time Ford has announced a production boost, with the original plan to build 500 cars in two years extended once already. Now that production of the hand-built, carbon-fiber-shelled car is finally up to the speed of one vehicle a day (or 250 a year), Ford says that it is responding to consumer demand and extending production.

To sell the extra 350 cars that the extension will bring, Ford is reopening applications for 30 days beginning Nov. 8. Not everyone is allowed to buy a new GT, however — there's a lengthy process to acquire the $400,000-plus car, with prospective owners filling out information on FordGT.com in the hopes of being selected for one of the exclusive cars. Last time, 6,500 applicants applied for just 1,000 cars, and 660 were chosen according to our sources — meaning that there are still more cars out there to be had. Prospective buyers who have already submitted applications but weren't selected can apply again.

"They have three options," Jim Owens, marketing manager for Ford Performance, told Cars.com during an event at the company's development track in Dearborn, Mich. "They can do nothing and their application will not be considered. They can notify us that they want to be considered and keep their application as it was. Or they can update their application for the next round." 

If you're one of the lucky few hundred chosen, you'll be contacted by Ford — but no earlier than 2020, according to Hermann Salenbauch, Ford Performance vehicle line director. You'll then be given the option to spec your vehicle and pony up the required cash ... and then you get to wait for the Canadian specialty shop that's building the cars to crank yours out. Stay patient.

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