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Omigod, It's Happening! Mid-Engine Corvette Is Real and Coming This Summer

Chevrolet Corvette

If you’ve been following the automotive rumor mill at all since (dead serious) the 1960s, you’ve been aware of Chevrolet’s waxing-and-waning commitment to making a mid-engine Corvette. Another extremely conspicuous version of the mid-engine Corvette has been testing across the U.S. for what feels like years, and GM has finally — finally! — confirmed that it will be a production vehicle, debuting July 18.

Related: Chevrolet Celebrates Racing History With 2019 Corvette Drivers Series

The announcement of the eighth-generation, or C8, Corvette comes with no official information beyond its debut date, but here are some of the many rumors collected by other outlets:

  • It might not offer a manual transmission at all … which would just be wrong.
  • Instead of the current C7’s eight-speed automatic, the C8 would have a seven-speed dual-clutch auto.
  • It might be a gas-electric hybrid at all levels, or on higher-performance trims.
  • A hybrid version would be all-wheel drive.
  • Prototypes produced so much torque that frames twisted and glass engine covers broke.
  • Names like Zora — for legendary Corvette engineer Zora Arkus-Duntov — have been bandied about for the entire car, or for a performance version, while Stingray may remain the name for lower trim levels.
  • Pricing should still be very competitive for the level of performance, with a starting price in the $60,000-to-$70,000 range.

Those rumors are covered at much greater length in this breakdown from Road & Track.

As part of the announcement of the C8’s debut, GM also announced that the last production C7 Corvette, a black 2019 Z06, will be auctioned at the Barrett-Jackson Northeast event in Connecticut June 28. All proceeds from the sale will go to GM’s preferred charity, the Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers Foundation.

Stay tuned for any more official information about the next mid-engine Corvette.

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