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2005 Pontiac Bonneville

$2,293 — $8,353 USED
Sedan
5-6 Seats
20-24 MPG
(Combined)
Key specs of the base trim
 — 
Compare 3 trims

Overview

Is this the car for you?

The Good

  • Performance
  • Interior space
  • Ride comfort
  • Driving ease

The Bad

  • Handling in SE
  • Fuel economy in city
  • Resale value of SE

What to Know

about the 2005 Pontiac Bonneville
  • SE and SLE with V-6
  • GXP with Northstar V-8
  • Performance-tuned suspension on GXP
  • Sporty styling
  • Available XM Satellite Radio

Our Take

from the Cars.com expert editorial team

Vehicle Overview
Pontiac's full-size front-wheel-drive sedan was last redesigned for the 2000 model year and received a face-lift for 2002. The supercharged SSEi edition was dropped from the 2004 lineup. A 205-horsepower, 3.8-liter V-6 powers the SE and SLE models.

A new GXP model powered by a 275-hp Northstar V-8 was introduced in early 2004. Fitted with a performance-tuned fully independent suspension, the GXP rides on 18-inch performance tires. The GXP also has General Motors' StabiliTrak electronic stability system and leather-appointed seats.

For 2005, the SLE gains styling cues borrowed from the GXP, including its lower-body treatment. The standard OnStar communication system gains improved hands-free capability.


Exterior
Bold styling identifies a Pontiac model among the crowd, and the Bonneville is no exception. Its design touches include a wedge profile, a sporty-looking twin-port grille and cat-eye headlights. Unique fascias, headlights, taillights and exhaust tips highlight the GXP sedan, which is equipped with a rear spoiler.

Measuring 202.6 inches long overall, the Bonneville is built on a 112.2-inch wheelbase. Cast-aluminum wheels on the SE hold 16-inch tires, while the SLE gets 17-inchers.


Interior
Bonnevilles can hold either five or six occupants. SE models are available with front bucket seats or a three-place front bench. Front head restraints move up and forward in a rear-end collision in order to be closer to the occupant's head. A small pass-thru fr...
Vehicle Overview
Pontiac's full-size front-wheel-drive sedan was last redesigned for the 2000 model year and received a face-lift for 2002. The supercharged SSEi edition was dropped from the 2004 lineup. A 205-horsepower, 3.8-liter V-6 powers the SE and SLE models.

A new GXP model powered by a 275-hp Northstar V-8 was introduced in early 2004. Fitted with a performance-tuned fully independent suspension, the GXP rides on 18-inch performance tires. The GXP also has General Motors' StabiliTrak electronic stability system and leather-appointed seats.

For 2005, the SLE gains styling cues borrowed from the GXP, including its lower-body treatment. The standard OnStar communication system gains improved hands-free capability.


Exterior
Bold styling identifies a Pontiac model among the crowd, and the Bonneville is no exception. Its design touches include a wedge profile, a sporty-looking twin-port grille and cat-eye headlights. Unique fascias, headlights, taillights and exhaust tips highlight the GXP sedan, which is equipped with a rear spoiler.

Measuring 202.6 inches long overall, the Bonneville is built on a 112.2-inch wheelbase. Cast-aluminum wheels on the SE hold 16-inch tires, while the SLE gets 17-inchers.


Interior
Bonnevilles can hold either five or six occupants. SE models are available with front bucket seats or a three-place front bench. Front head restraints move up and forward in a rear-end collision in order to be closer to the occupant's head. A small pass-thru from the interior to the trunk is present, but the rear seatback doesn't fold down.

In addition to leather-appointed seats with suede inserts, the GXP sedan gets a brushed-aluminum gearshift handle and carbon-fiber trim. A CD player with Monsoon sound entertains GXP occupants, who also benefit from dual-zone automatic climate control.


Under the Hood
The SE and SLE are equipped with a 205-hp, 3.8-liter V-6. The GXP's 4.6-liter Northstar V-8 produces 275 hp and 300 pounds-feet of torque. Both engines team with a four-speed-automatic transmission.

Safety
Antilock brakes are standard on all models. Side-impact airbags are standard in the GXP and optional in other trim levels.

Driving Impressions
The Bonneville has long been considered a fine road car � among GM's best, offering plenty of virtues to attract big-car fans. Because the regular V-6 delivers such strong performance, there's little need for a larger engine. Drivers are likely to feel a welcome burst of acceleration when they push the gas pedal to pass or merge in a hurry. Still, buyers who crave power have the GXP model.

Handling on regular Bonnevilles fails to stand out, but these models steer with a light touch and respond capably to driver inputs and during cornering. In quick curves, body lean is noticeable but not dramatic. The SE rides comfortably most of the time and is very easy to drive. Rear-seat passengers get good legroom, with ample space all around.


Consumer Reviews

What drivers are saying

4.8
23 reviews — Read All reviews
Exterior Styling
(4.8)
Performance
(4.7)
Interior Design
(4.6)
Comfort
(4.9)
Reliability
(4.6)
Value For The Money
(4.7)

Read reviews that mention:

(5.0)

Good vehicle for a family

by Fkay from Provo on July 16, 2018

I love this auto! Been a great ride on the freeway& around town.Has a lot of punch when you need it.Very comfortable inside , extra roomy all around. Read full review

(5.0)

Never let me down! GMSHOUILD HAVE PHASED OUT BUICK

by Just the facts from NEW YORK on June 16, 2018

Solid car! GM should never had phased out Pontiac it should have been Buick!! Seriously ..AS far as styling and performance pontiac had hit it on the money. For an example look at Dodge very ... Read full review

Safety

Recalls and crash tests

Recalls

The 2005 Pontiac Bonneville currently has 0 recalls


Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

The 2005 Pontiac Bonneville has not been tested.

Latest 2005 Bonneville Stories

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The Bonneville received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker