2007 Pontiac Grand Prix

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$21,815

starting MSRP

2007 Pontiac Grand Prix

Key specs

Base trim shown

Overview

The good:

  • Performance, especially of supercharged version
  • Handling of upper models
  • Front and rear headroom
  • Sporty appearance

The bad:

  • City fuel economy with supercharged engine
  • Resale values
  • Backseat legroom and comfort
  • Aging design
  • ABS is optional

3 trims

Starting msrp listed lowest to highest price

Wondering which trim is right for you?

Our 2007 Pontiac Grand Prix trim comparison will help you decide.

Notable features

  • Two 3.8-liter V-6s
  • 5.3-liter V-8 in GXP
  • TAPshift gear-change feature in GXP
  • Optional side curtain airbags
  • Special Edition package

2007 Pontiac Grand Prix review: Our expert's take

Vehicle Overview
Pontiac revamped its midsize front-wheel-drive Grand Prix sedan for 2004. Now in its ninth generation, the Grand Prix has styling overtones that are related to the automaker’s GTO, which was discontinued following the 2006 model year.

The Grand Prix enters the 2007 model year with few changes. Five new exterior colors, including Purple Haze Metallic, are now offered, and the optional 17-inch wheels for base and GT Grand Prix models are finished in chrome. A tire pressure monitoring system is standard.

General Motors’ OnStar communication system is standard. A TAPshift (Touch Activated Power) system lets the driver of a GXP sedan use paddles on the steering wheel to change the automatic transmission’s gears.

Exterior
The Grand Prix’s smooth sides are said to be Coke-bottle shaped, a theme that harks back to the muscle-car era. They extend into a twin-port grille and a two-tone lower fascia. Large corner-mounted taillights flank the rear spoiler.

Built on a 110.5-inch wheelbase, the Grand Prix extends to 198.3 inches long overall. Fog lamps are standard on GT and GXP models. Standard wheels measure 16 inches in diameter, but 17-inchers are optional; the GXP gets 18-inch tires.

Interior
Each Grand Prix is spacious enough for five adults. The deep trunk holds 16 cubic feet of cargo, and there’s a pass-thru in the 60/40-split, folding backseat.

Sizable analog gauges have a 3-D look, and the doors display satin-nickel accents. The GXP’s standard head-up display allows the driver to extinguish all instrument panel lighting for enhanced visibility during night driving.

Under the Hood
A 200-horsepower, 3.8-liter V-6 is standard in the base sedan. The GT sedan is equipped with a supercharged version that develops 260 hp. In the GXP sedan, a 5.3-liter V-8 generates 303 hp at 5,600 rpm and 323 pounds-feet of torque at 4,400 rpm. All engines drive a four-speed automatic transmission.

Safety
Antilock brakes are standard on GT and GXP models and optional on the base sedan. Side curtain airbags are optional. The GXP has an electronic stability system.

Driving Impressions
Even though the Grand Prix has many appealing features, it doesn’t quite compare to European and most Asian models in terms of solidness. It does, however, perform energetically, especially with supercharged power. Promising strong passing performance, it accelerates from a standstill with vigor, but there’s little evidence of a supercharger. Pontiac’s paddle shifters work well but may suffer a little delay.

The Grand Prix’s suspension eases over most road flaws, but it gives the impression of avoiding rather than absorbing them. Good handling without major loss in ride comfort is a bonus with the upper models. Headroom is ample in each seating position, but the optional power sunroof steals some space.

Consumer reviews

Rating breakdown (out of 5):
  • Comfort 4.6
  • Interior design 4.4
  • Performance 4.6
  • Value for the money 4.3
  • Exterior styling 4.6
  • Reliability 4.3

Most recent consumer reviews

4.9

Best car I owned

The first car I ever owned, powerful, comfortable, but without a lot of features in contemporary cars. No aux cord, no backup camera, definitely no Bluetooth. The 3.6L Supercharged V6 in the GT was a dream to drive, the whine of the supercharger spooling ingrained in my memory. I had a few reliability issues, having the serpentine belt fall off while driving and having to replace the water pump as well as having a hole pop up in my muffler which I never got fixed due to totaling the car.

5.0

Pretty good shape interior

Needed a lot of body and engine work done to it exhaust leaked breaks were bad and the wheel bearing was off set The car got totaled in a hit and run accident and loss control and was thrown into a ditch there was no saving this car at all

4.6

At 245,000 and going and going

Owned it since about 25,000 miles. I'm at 245,000 and counting. It's a GT, 3.8L supercharger with leather, heated seats and remote start. Engine and transmission have never had problems - but I've done all the preventive maintenance.

See all 40 consumer reviews

Warranty

New car program benefits
Bumper-to-bumper
36 months/36,000 miles
Corrosion
72 months/100,000 miles
Powertrain
60 months/100,000 miles
Roadside assistance
60 months/100,000 miles

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