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2020 Toyota Camry: What’s Changed

2020 Toyota Camry TRD

Most significant changes: New TRD model, standard Android Auto

Price change: $280 higher on the gas XLE and XSE; $330 higher on the base L; $370 higher on the LE and SE; on the Camry Hybrid, $30 higher on the LE and SE, $245 less on the XLE; no change to $955 destination charge

On sale: Now

Which should you buy, a 2019 or 2020? If you use an Android phone, the 2020 model is the obvious choice. If that isn’t a factor and you don’t want a TRD model, then a 2019 version should be cheaper.

Toyota is turning to performance to try to rev up sales of the 2020 Camry mid-size sedan, one of its consistently best-selling models, in an era when more buyers want SUVs than sedans.

Related: Auto Show Face-Off: 2020 Subaru Legacy Vs. 2019 Toyota Camry

A new TRD model comes with a V-6 engine, a firmer suspension, large brake rotors, 19-inch black alloy wheels, side skirts, a rear spoiler, and black and red exterior and interior trim, giving it a meaner look than other Camry models. The TRD starts at $32,125 (all prices include destination).

Elsewhere in the Camry lineup, all models get standard Android Auto, adding to Apple CarPlay and Amazon Alexa connectivity that were made standard for the 2019 model.

Choices for gas-engine models start with the base L with a base price of $25,380, $330 higher than 2019. Base prices are $280 higher on the XLE and XSE models, with those models starting at $30,410 and $30,960, respectively; they’re $370 higher on the LE and SE. The LE now starts at $25,925 and the SE at $27,125.

A 206-horsepower, 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine is standard on all gas models except the TRD, and a 301-hp, 3.5-liter V-6 is available on the XLE and XSE. All gas models come with an eight-speed automatic transmission.

Price increases for 2020 models are lower for the Camry Hybrid. The Hybrid LE and SE start at $29,385 and $31,085, respectively, just $30 more than in 2019. Base price on the Hybrid XLE is $33,685, a $245 decrease. All hybrid models come with a 2.5-liter four-cylinder, continuously variable automatic transmission, electric motor and hybrid battery pack (lithium-ion on the LE and nickel-metal hydride on the SE and XLE) for a combined 176 system hp.

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Toyota gave the Camry edgier styling and better ride and handling with a 2018 redesign, along with a suite of safety features that includes automatic emergency braking and lane departure with steering assist. Camry’s long-standing reputation for reliability and value make it a more compelling choice among mid-size sedans.

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