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2025 Acura MDX Gets a Refresh, Ditches Its Touchpad (Finally!)

acura mdx 2025 exterior oem 04 jpg 2025 Acura MDX | Manufacturer image

Competes with: Cadillac XT6, Genesis GV80, Infiniti QX60, Lexus RX, Lincoln Nautilus

Looks like: The MDX is a little leaner and meaner

Powertrain: 290-horsepower, 3.5-liter V-6 or 355-hp, turbocharged 3.0-liter V-6 (Type S) engine; 10-speed automatic transmission; front- or all-wheel drive

Hits dealerships: May

Acura is refreshing its flagship MDX SUV for the 2025 model year, and while the changes seem minor, they’re a pretty big deal. Subtle exterior styling updates will be hard to spot even for the most hardcore Acura fan, but inside, the MDX ditches its oft-criticized True Touchpad Interface for a new seemingly straightforward touchscreen display.

Related: 2024 Acura MDX Type S Quick Spin: Performance for a Price

For 2025, the sporty A-Spec variant is available with Acura’s Advance Package for the first time, combining its go-fast looks with comfort and convenience, and the top-of-the-line Type S — the sportiest MDX — gets its own unique styling updates, too.

A Touch of Styling

On the outside of the 2025 MDX, the refresh is most prominent at the front, with updated grille designs and darker headlights. The Type S gets much more aggressive front styling and has additional mesh across the front bumper connecting the two large side intakes. Wheel designs are new across multiple trims, and new paint colors are available, as well.

More Than a Touch of Touchscreen

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Perhaps our most consistent complaint about Acuras in recent years has been the difficulty of using the True Touchpad Interface. Rather than give many of its models — including the MDX — a touchscreen, Acura placed a display on the dashboard high and far from the driver and required the use of a touchpad on the center console to control it. Touching specific areas of the touchpad corresponded to those areas on the screen, but it was distracting to use and made features like Apple CarPlay and Android Auto frustrating instead of useful.

It seems like Acura has finally heard our pleas, as the 2025 MDX ditches the TTI for a 12.3-inch touchscreen display with Google Built-In and standard wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto. We’ll have to use it before we can give our full evaluation, but on its face, this is a welcome change.

Acura calls the interior update a “total makeover,” with new seat designs and increased center console space for things like wireless device charging, but there are familiar elements, as well. The push-button gear selector and large drive mode selector knob remain, as do a bevy of seemingly physical controls for climate and audio functions. Audiophiles may want to consider the MDX Type S, which now comes standard with the Advance Package (that’s not really an option package, then, is it?) and gets a new Bang & Olufsen sound system with six more speakers than were previously available, for a total of 31. Acura also says it’s made enhancements to reduce road and wind noise intrusions in the cabin in some versions of the MDX.

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No Touches to the Powertrain

While the exterior and interior receive updates, things stay the same under the hood of the MDX. Most versions of the MDX are available with a 3.5-liter V-6 engine, good for 290 horsepower and 267 pounds-feet of torque. It pairs with a 10-speed automatic transmission, and front-wheel drive is standard, while all-wheel drive is available.

Upgrade to the sporty MDX Type S, and the V-6 gets downsized while adding a turbocharger. The turbo 3.0-liter V-6 makes 355 hp and 354 pounds-feet; it’s still paired to a 10-speed auto, too, but this one has been sport tuned. Standard AWD helps keep the rubber on the road, and the Type S gets other performance enhancements, including an air suspension with adaptive dampers and Brembo-brand front brakes.

In 2024 models, fuel economy for the 3.5-liter V-6 topped out at an EPA-rated 22 mpg combined with FWD and 21 mpg combined with AWD, while the turbocharged Type S could only muster 19 mpg combined. We don’t have fuel economy ratings for the 2025 model yet, but expect similar figures.

Some Safety Touches

The 2025 MDX’s standard AcuraWatch 360 suite of safety tech gets updated hardware and adds three new features. Active lane change assist is available on certain divided highways (as identified via Google Built-In’s Google Maps function) and can complete automated lane changes when both adaptive cruise control and lane-centering steering are engaged. The hardware enhancements also include Lane Change Collision Mitigation, which can steer the vehicle away from collisions when changing lanes, and front cross-traffic warning, which works at low speeds to identify oncoming vehicles from the side and alert the driver to reduce the likelihood of a collision.

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Pricing and Availability

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Acura says the updated 2025 MDX will go on sale in May and should announce pricing soon. The 2024 MDX started at $51,500, while the loaded Type S with the (again, now standard) Advance Package cost a whopping $75,150 (all prices include destination fees).

Cars.com’s Editorial department is your source for automotive news and reviews. In line with Cars.com’s long-standing ethics policy, editors and reviewers don’t accept gifts or free trips from automakers. The Editorial department is independent of Cars.com’s advertising, sales and sponsored content departments.

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Road Test Editor Brian Normile joined the automotive industry and Cars.com in 2013, and he became part of the Editorial staff in 2014. Brian spent his childhood devouring every car magazine he got his hands on — not literally, eventually — and now reviews and tests vehicles to help consumers make informed choices. Someday, Brian hopes to learn what to do with his hands when he’s reviewing a car on camera. He would daily-drive an Alfa Romeo 4C if he could. Email Brian Normile

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