2011 Lincoln MKT

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$7,176–$17,720 USED Shop local deals
(4.5) 6 reviews
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Key Specs
Our Take
Road Test
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Safety & Recalls
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Key Specs

of the 2011 Lincoln MKT. Base trim shown.

Our Take

From the Cars.com Vehicle Test Team

The Good

  • EcoBoost V-6's performance and fuel economy
  • Interior materials quality
  • Lots of standard features
  • Second-row comfort

The Bad

  • Third-row headroom
  • Looks a bit bloated from the back

Notable Features of the 2011 Lincoln MKT

  • Seating for six or seven
  • Optional 355-hp, twin-turbo EcoBoost V-6
  • FWD or AWD
  • Optional refrigerator

2011 Lincoln MKT Road Test

David Thomas

The MKT is an impressive combination of performance, utility, technology and even affordability among its competition — and I want one in my driveway.

When I reviewed the MKT when it debuted for 2010, I was smitten with the massive, pseudo-luxury people-hauler. Sure, its looks are beyond polarizing. Considering I'm one of the only Cars.com editors who likes the styling, I'd say you have a one in 10 chance of finding someone of a similar mind. Good luck getting your spouse to sign up.

Not much about the MKT has changed for 2011, but that's typical just a year after a new car debuts. To check out the few changes, go here.

Driving

Equipped with an optional EcoBoost turbocharged V-6 engine and all-wheel drive, the MKT hustles through town and carves up interstates like a sushi chef does tuna. It's a thrilling experience, mainly because you're piloting a vehicle that you could accurately call a boat. At 207.6 inches long, it's huge; it might not fit in your garage. It doesn't feel nimble on the road, meaning it doesn't take corners easily — you have to take the long wheelbase into account — but all that power comes on perfectly, without any turbo lag.

Looks

Whether it's the hearse-like black, the eggplant-purple or the dark red one I ogle at my local Lincoln dealership whenever I drive by, I think the MKT is a breathtaking design.

Others might say it takes their breath away in another manner, howeve...

The MKT is an impressive combination of performance, utility, technology and even affordability among its competition — and I want one in my driveway.

When I reviewed the MKT when it debuted for 2010, I was smitten with the massive, pseudo-luxury people-hauler. Sure, its looks are beyond polarizing. Considering I'm one of the only Cars.com editors who likes the styling, I'd say you have a one in 10 chance of finding someone of a similar mind. Good luck getting your spouse to sign up.

Not much about the MKT has changed for 2011, but that's typical just a year after a new car debuts. To check out the few changes, go here.

Driving

Equipped with an optional EcoBoost turbocharged V-6 engine and all-wheel drive, the MKT hustles through town and carves up interstates like a sushi chef does tuna. It's a thrilling experience, mainly because you're piloting a vehicle that you could accurately call a boat. At 207.6 inches long, it's huge; it might not fit in your garage. It doesn't feel nimble on the road, meaning it doesn't take corners easily — you have to take the long wheelbase into account — but all that power comes on perfectly, without any turbo lag.

Looks

Whether it's the hearse-like black, the eggplant-purple or the dark red one I ogle at my local Lincoln dealership whenever I drive by, I think the MKT is a breathtaking design.

Others might say it takes their breath away in another manner, however.

The drooping fangs of the giant grille and the narrow headlights give it a slightly sinister face, while the rear is a tad bulbous and art-deco inspired.

On the whole, though, it's hard to make something this large look all that bad, but everyone has an opinion. If you've made it this far into this review, maybe we're of like minds on the styling.

Interior

The problem with the MKT is that it's a Lincoln, and Ford's luxury brand is still a work in progress when it comes to interior materials. Everything is fairly nice, but compared with a Lexus or Acura, it's a step or two below in certain areas. Luckily, versus the Acura MDX you get much more space in the MKT for nearly identical dollars. Against the new Lexus GX I recently tested, you get a vastly better driving experience and save thousands on the MKT's sticker.

Despite a slightly chintzier button here and a clunkier plastic door panel there, I'll still take the MKT.

The driver's seat is comfortable for shorter drivers, but many editors who are 6 feet and taller had a hard time getting it to go far enough back, which hurt the MKT in a recent Faceoff against the MDX and Buick Enclave.

The one difference between my 2011 tester and the 2010 you see in the video on the right was the inclusion of optional second-row captain's chairs and a center-mounted refrigerator. Not only do you lose the capacity to carry an extra person, the added cargo area seems useless, especially the small refrigerator. I also didn't find the seats all that comfortable; they're not a huge upgrade from the bench. Save $995 and go with the bench seat — and save yourself another $895 by not adding that refrigerator.

The third row is uncomfortable in terms of headroom. The sloping rear design aesthetic on the outside means your head will butt the ceiling inside, unless you're a small child or teenager. Adults over 5-foot-5 or so will never want to be placed there. It's unfortunate, because the smaller MDX and Enclave have somewhat comfortable third rows despite being considerably shorter than the MKT. The Ford Flex, upon which the MKT is based, doesn't have the headroom issue either because of its boxy design. 

Cargo

When the third row seats are up, there's a nice, deep well, similar to what you find in a minivan, delivering 17.9 cubic feet of storage. The seats fold flat to expand to a very usable 39.6 cubic feet of volume behind the second row. Once all the seats are folded, maximum cargo space is 75.9 cubic feet.

Safety

The Lincoln MKT is a Top Safety Pick from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, which means it scores the top grade of Good in front, side and rear crash tests, as well as a new roof-strength test for rollovers. The only other luxury three-row crossover to receive this score is the Volvo XC90, and the non-luxury winners with three rows (besides the MKT's Ford Flex sibling) — the Dodge Journey, Subaru Tribeca and Toyota Highlander — are smaller.

The MKT can be equipped with an optional blind spot warning system, adaptive cruise control and a collision warning system.

Lincoln MKT in the Market

Sometimes the luster fades off an all-new model when you revisit it a year later. Newer designs come along to woo you, and often the love you once felt for it just doesn't seem as alluring. And sometimes it does.

I'm glad the MKT returned to my clutches for 2011, because I still love this ungainly looking crossover. I also, however, am a realist who understands that the world doesn't always share my tastes.

Send David an email  



Latest 2011 MKT Stories

Consumer Reviews

Exterior Styling
(3.7)
Performance
(4.8)
Interior Design
(4.8)
Comfort
(4.8)
Reliability
(4.0)
Value For The Money
(4.2)

What Drivers Are Saying

(5.0)

Most comfortable car I've ever owned.

by DanD from Brunswick, OH on August 3, 2018

This car has all the bells and whistles expected from a luxury car. AWD is excellent in the snow! 7 passenger seating with tons of leg room. Priced well below similar cars. Read full review

(5.0)

Great luxury car.

by Terry from Chetek on October 21, 2017

This is a great luxury car. It has a great ride, all wheel drive, turbo charged engine, and towing capabilities. Read full review

Safety & Recalls

Recalls

The 2011 Lincoln MKT currently has 1 recall

IIHS Crash and Rollover Test Ratings

Based on 2011 Lincoln MKT Base

IIHS rates vehicles good, acceptable, marginal, or poor.

Head Restraints and Seats

Dynamic Rating
good
Overall Rear
good
Seat Head/Restraint Geometry
good

Moderate overlap front

Chest
good
Head/Neck
good
Left Leg/Foot
good
Overall Front
good
Restraints
good
Right Leg/Foot
good
Structure/safety cage
good

Other

Roof Strength
good

Side

Driver Head Protection
good
Driver Head and Neck
good
Driver Pelvis/Leg
good
Driver Torso
good
Overall Side
good
Rear Passenger Head Protection
good
Rear Passenger Head and Neck
good
Rear Passenger Pelvis/Leg
good
Rear Passenger Torso
good
Structure/safety cage
acceptable
Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) is a nonprofit research and communications organization funded by auto insurers.

Manufacturer Warranty

  • Bumper-to-Bumper

    48 months / 50,000 miles

  • Powertrain

    72 months / 70,000 miles

  • Roadside Assistance

    72 months / 70,000 miles

CPO Program & Warranty

Certified Pre-Owned by Lincoln

Program Benefits

24-hour roadside assistance, rental car reimbursement for up to $45 per day, fresh oil and filter at delivery and certificate for your first complimentary oil and filter change

  • Limited Warranty

    6 years / 100,000 miles

    6 years from original new vehicle warranty start date or 100,000 miles. Comprehensive Limited Warranty from original in-service date. See dealer for details.
  • Eligibility

    Under 6 years / 60,000 miles

    Vehicles receive a 200-point inspection and reconditioning.

    See inspection details.

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Cars.com Car Seat Check

Certified child passenger safety technicians conduct hands-on tests of a car’s Latch system and check the vehicle’s ability to accommodate different types of car seats. The MKT received the following grades on a scale of A-F.*
* This score may not apply to all trims, especially for vehicles with multiple body styles that affect the space and design of the seating.

Warranty FAQs

What is a Bumper-to-Bumper warranty?

Often called a basic warranty or new-vehicle warranty, a bumper-to-bumper policy covers components like air conditioning, audio systems, vehicle sensors, fuel systems and major electrical components. Most policies exclude regular maintenance like fluid top offs and oil changes, but a few brands have separate free-maintenance provisions, and those that do offer them is slowly rising. Bumper-to-bumper warranties typically expire faster than powertrain warranties.

What is a Powertrain warranty?

Don't be misled a 10-year or 100,000-mile powertrain warranty doesn't promise a decade of free repairs for your car. It typically covers just the engine and transmission, along with any other moving parts that lead to the wheels, like the driveshaft and constant velocity joints. Some automakers also bundle seat belts and airbags into their powertrain warranties. With a few exceptions, powertrain warranties don't cover regular maintenance like engine tuneups and tire rotations.

What is included in Roadside Assistance?

Some automakers include roadside assistance with their bumper-to-bumper or powertrain warranties, while others have separate policies. These programs cover anything from flat-tire changes and locksmith services to jump-starts and towing. Few reimburse incidental costs like motel rooms (if you have to wait for repairs).

What other services could be included in a warranty?

Some automakers include free scheduled maintenance for items such as oil changes, air filters and tire rotations. Some include consumables including brake pads and windshield wipers; others do not. They are typically for the first couple of years of ownership of a new car.

What does CPO mean?

A certified pre-owned or CPO car has been inspected to meet minimum quality standards and typically includes some type of warranty. While dealers and third parties certify cars, the gold standard is an automaker-certified vehicle that provides a factory-backed warranty, often extending the original coverage. Vehicles must be in excellent condition and have low miles and wear to be certified, which is why off-lease vehicles feed many CPO programs.

See also the latest CPO incentives by automaker