NEWS

2017 Jeep Compass: Real-World Cargo Space

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CARS.COM — The redesigned 2017 Jeep Compass has 27.2 cubic feet of cargo space behind the backseat, and 59.8 cubic feet of cargo space with the backseat folded — but what does that really look like? Specifications like cargo volume can be misleading. So during Cars.com’s 2017 Compact SUV Challenge, we placed a standard set of cargo items in each cargo area to visualize the differences among the 2018 Chevrolet Equinox, 2017 Ford Escape, 2017 Honda CR-V, 2017 Compass, 2017 Mazda CX-5, 2017.5 Nissan Rogue and 2018 Volkswagen Tiguan.

Related: See Other Compact SUVs’ Real-World Cargo Space

Shop the 2017 Jeep New Compass near you

Used
2017 Jeep New Compass Sport
71,500 mi.
$12,900
Used
2017 Jeep New Compass Latitude
75,092 mi.
$11,450

Cargo to be put in the Jeep Compass included a 23-inch adult bicycle and an adjustable cardboard box tested in two sizes: 37 inches long, 6 inches wide and 41 inches tall, which we fit behind the backseat, and an expanded 70-by-6-by-41 inches, which we fit with the backseat folded. And to top it off, a pair of golf bags in the Jeep’s rear. Though we laid the cardboard box flat for visualization of the car’s rear cargo area, general practice for transporting a cardboard box like ours with a flat-screen TV inside is to keep the TV upright.

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Judging by specs or just by looking at the overall size, it’s clear the Compass has smaller dimensions and less passenger volume than the other SUV interiors. The Jeep Compass struggled in our cargo tests, unable to fit the small or expanded box laid flat in the cargo area. Only one rear cargo area in this test could fit the small box behind the backseat, the 2018 Volkswagen Tiguan. All others could fit the expanded box behind the backseat except the Compass — which had the box protruding out of the Jeep’s cargo area. The bicycle had to be finagled over the Compass’ large load-in height and around the intrusive wheel wells. Sure, it fit in the Jeep, but not as easily as the other, larger compact sport utility vehicles.

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Photo of Joe Bruzek
Managing Editor Joe Bruzek’s 22 years of automotive experience doesn’t count the lifelong obsession that started as a kid admiring his dad’s 1964 Chevrolet Corvette — and continues to this day. Joe’s been an automotive journalist with Cars.com for 16 years, writing shopper-focused car reviews, news and research content. As Managing Editor, one of his favorite areas of focus is helping shoppers understand electric cars and how to determine whether going electric is right for them. In his free time, Joe maintains a love-hate relationship with his 1998 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am that he wishes would fix itself. LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/joe-bruzek-2699b41b/ Email Joe Bruzek

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